Gender and Discipline in 'The Singapore Story': The Chinese female factory workers in perspective, 1980 - 1990

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

Abstract

In his conclusion to Rickshaw Coolie, James Warren underscores the intention of his book, which is to ‘bring back to Singapore’s own Chinese people and society, a singkeh coolie culture and history, which is, finally, their own – a People’s History (Warren 1986, 326).’ In the two decades since the publication of Rickshaw Coolie, Warren’s intentions have been echoed in a comparatively small but growing body of literature on Singapore’s history. But what is People’s History? What do such histories offer to the readers in the present especially with regard to past and existing trends in the practice of writing about Singapore's past?
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationReframing Singapore
Subtitle of host publicationMemory, Identity and Trans-regionalism
EditorsDerek Heng, Syed Muhd Khairudin Aljunied
Place of PublicationNetherlands
PublisherAmsterdam University Press
Chapter6
Pages109-130
Number of pages21
ISBN (Electronic)9789048508211
ISBN (Print)9789089640949
Publication statusPublished - 2009
Externally publishedYes

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    Koh, E. (2009). Gender and Discipline in 'The Singapore Story': The Chinese female factory workers in perspective, 1980 - 1990. In D. Heng, & S. M. K. Aljunied (Eds.), Reframing Singapore: Memory, Identity and Trans-regionalism (pp. 109-130). Amsterdam University Press.