Gender-specific situational correlates of syringe sharing during a single injection episode

Travis Hottes, Julie Bruneau, Mark DANIEL

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Factors associated with syringe sharing differ between women and men; however, it is uncertain whether these hold within the setting of a single injection episode. A questionnaire eliciting information about the last injection episode with others present was administered to participants in a cohort of Montréal injection drug users (IDUs). Logistic regression was used to identify correlates of syringe sharing and to test potential gender differences in relation to syringe sharing. Data from 467 participants revealed significant differences between men and women with regard to situational factors; however, the relationships between situational factors and syringe sharing did not vary according to gender. In multivariate models including both genders, syringe sharing was associated with various attributes of other IDUs who were present as well as alcohol use during that specific episode. These results highlight the relevance of situational factors in injection drug use activity, regardless of gender
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-85
Number of pages11
JournalAIDS Behavior
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Needle Sharing
Injections
Drug Users
Logistic Models
Alcohols
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Cite this

@article{3d62e06042b34d128273e019277cf84d,
title = "Gender-specific situational correlates of syringe sharing during a single injection episode",
abstract = "Factors associated with syringe sharing differ between women and men; however, it is uncertain whether these hold within the setting of a single injection episode. A questionnaire eliciting information about the last injection episode with others present was administered to participants in a cohort of Montr{\'e}al injection drug users (IDUs). Logistic regression was used to identify correlates of syringe sharing and to test potential gender differences in relation to syringe sharing. Data from 467 participants revealed significant differences between men and women with regard to situational factors; however, the relationships between situational factors and syringe sharing did not vary according to gender. In multivariate models including both genders, syringe sharing was associated with various attributes of other IDUs who were present as well as alcohol use during that specific episode. These results highlight the relevance of situational factors in injection drug use activity, regardless of gender",
author = "Travis Hottes and Julie Bruneau and Mark DANIEL",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1007/s10461-009-9530-5",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "75--85",
journal = "AIDS Behavior",
issn = "1090-7165",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "1",

}

Gender-specific situational correlates of syringe sharing during a single injection episode. / Hottes, Travis; Bruneau, Julie; DANIEL, Mark.

In: AIDS Behavior, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2011, p. 75-85.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gender-specific situational correlates of syringe sharing during a single injection episode

AU - Hottes, Travis

AU - Bruneau, Julie

AU - DANIEL, Mark

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Factors associated with syringe sharing differ between women and men; however, it is uncertain whether these hold within the setting of a single injection episode. A questionnaire eliciting information about the last injection episode with others present was administered to participants in a cohort of Montréal injection drug users (IDUs). Logistic regression was used to identify correlates of syringe sharing and to test potential gender differences in relation to syringe sharing. Data from 467 participants revealed significant differences between men and women with regard to situational factors; however, the relationships between situational factors and syringe sharing did not vary according to gender. In multivariate models including both genders, syringe sharing was associated with various attributes of other IDUs who were present as well as alcohol use during that specific episode. These results highlight the relevance of situational factors in injection drug use activity, regardless of gender

AB - Factors associated with syringe sharing differ between women and men; however, it is uncertain whether these hold within the setting of a single injection episode. A questionnaire eliciting information about the last injection episode with others present was administered to participants in a cohort of Montréal injection drug users (IDUs). Logistic regression was used to identify correlates of syringe sharing and to test potential gender differences in relation to syringe sharing. Data from 467 participants revealed significant differences between men and women with regard to situational factors; however, the relationships between situational factors and syringe sharing did not vary according to gender. In multivariate models including both genders, syringe sharing was associated with various attributes of other IDUs who were present as well as alcohol use during that specific episode. These results highlight the relevance of situational factors in injection drug use activity, regardless of gender

U2 - 10.1007/s10461-009-9530-5

DO - 10.1007/s10461-009-9530-5

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - 75

EP - 85

JO - AIDS Behavior

JF - AIDS Behavior

SN - 1090-7165

IS - 1

ER -