Genetic rescue restores long-term viability of an isolated population of adders (Vipera berus)

Thomas Madsen, Jon Loman, Lewis Anderberg, Håkan Anderberg, Arthur Georges, Beata Ujvari

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

Abstract

Climate change is regarded as a major threat to global biodiversity [1]. However, another key driver of declines in biodiversity during the last century has been, and still is, the devastating impact of anthropogenic habitat destruction [2]. Human degradation of natural habitats has resulted in large, formerly homogeneous areas becoming exceedingly isolated and fragmented, resulting in reduced genetic diversity and a concomitant increased vulnerability to pathogens [3] and increased risk of inbreeding [4]. In order to restore genetic diversity in small isolated or fragmented populations, genetic rescue - that is, an intervention in which unrelated individuals are brought into a population, leading to introduction of novel alleles - has been shown to reduce the deleterious effects of inbreeding [4,5].

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1297-1299
Number of pages2
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume30
Issue number21
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Nov 2020

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