'Give it a go you apes': relations between the Sydney and Melbourne Film Festivals

Catherine Hope, Adam Dickerson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper extends our previous analyses of the early history of the Sydney and Melbourne Film Festivals, by examining the relations between the festivals and the Australian film industry, from 1954 to 1970. [1] Like those previous papers, it is built on the premise that the history of the two Festivals is best understood as an ongoing negotiation between the demands of ‘culture’ (that is, what is required of the festivals in their role as self-conscious representatives of film culture) and the demands of ‘industry’ (that is, what is required of the festivals to prosper as organisations embedded within a web of institutions of film production, distribution, and the like). The relationship between the Festivals and the Australian film industry in these years is of historical interest for two reasons. First, it provides an alternative perspective on the industry during this period. Second, it offers an interesting illustration of the creative strategies used by the Festivals to survive and flourish, whilst maintaining their institutional and cultural identity
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalScreening the Past
Volume1
Issue number30
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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Film Festivals
Apes
Melbourne
Industry
Film Industry
Early History
Film Production
Film Culture
World Wide Web
Cultural Identity
History
Conscious

Cite this

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'Give it a go you apes': relations between the Sydney and Melbourne Film Festivals. / Hope, Catherine; Dickerson, Adam.

In: Screening the Past, Vol. 1, No. 30, 2011, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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