Global Scale Variation in the Salinity Sensitivity of Riverine Macroinvertebrates: Eastern Australia, France, Israel and South Africa

Ben Kefford, Graeme Hickey, Avital Gasith, Elad Ben-David, Jason Dunlop, Carolyn Palmer, Kaylene Allan, Satish Choy, Christophe Piscart

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    45 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Salinity is a key abiotic property of inland waters; it has a major influence on biotic communities and is affected by many natural and anthropogenic processes. Salinity of inland waters tends to increase with aridity, and biota of inland waters may have evolved greater salt tolerance in more arid regions. Here we compare the sensitivity of stream macroinvertebrate species to salinity from a relatively wet region in France (Lorraine and Brittany) to that in three relatively arid regions eastern Australia (Victoria, Queensland and Tasmania), South Africa (south-east of the Eastern Cape Province) and Israel using the identical experimental method in all locations. The species whose salinity tolerance was tested, were somewhat more salt tolerant in eastern Australia and South Africa than France, with those in Israel being intermediate. However, by far the greatest source of variation in species sensitivity was between taxonomic groups (Order and Class) and not between the regions. We used a Bayesian statistical model to estimate the species sensitivity distributions (SSDs) for salinity in eastern Australia and France adjusting for the assemblages of species in these regions. The assemblage in France was slightly more salinity sensitive than that in eastern Australia. We therefore suggest that regional salinity sensitivity is therefore likely to depend most on the taxonomic composition of respective macroinvertebrate assemblages. On this basis it would be possible to screen rivers globally for risk from salinisation.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-12
    Number of pages12
    JournalPLoS One
    Volume7
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Fingerprint

    Salinity
    Israel
    South Africa
    macroinvertebrates
    France
    Arid regions
    salinity
    Water
    inland waters
    Salts
    Biota
    arid zones
    Rivers
    Victoria (Australia)
    Tasmania
    Salt-Tolerance
    Eastern Africa
    biocenosis
    Queensland
    Chemical analysis

    Cite this

    Kefford, Ben ; Hickey, Graeme ; Gasith, Avital ; Ben-David, Elad ; Dunlop, Jason ; Palmer, Carolyn ; Allan, Kaylene ; Choy, Satish ; Piscart, Christophe. / Global Scale Variation in the Salinity Sensitivity of Riverine Macroinvertebrates: Eastern Australia, France, Israel and South Africa. In: PLoS One. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 5. pp. 1-12.
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    Global Scale Variation in the Salinity Sensitivity of Riverine Macroinvertebrates: Eastern Australia, France, Israel and South Africa. / Kefford, Ben; Hickey, Graeme; Gasith, Avital; Ben-David, Elad; Dunlop, Jason; Palmer, Carolyn; Allan, Kaylene; Choy, Satish; Piscart, Christophe.

    In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 5, 2012, p. 1-12.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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