Glycated hemoglobin as an indicator of social environmental stress among indigenous versus westernized populations

Mark Daniel, Kerin O'Dea, Kevin G. Rowley, Robyn McDermott, Shona Kelly

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36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. This study assessed whether glycated hemoglobin concentration, an indicator of psychogenic stress, differs between indigenous populations and non-indigenous reference groups. Methods. Multivariate and stratified analyses were undertaken of cross-sectional data from multi-center community-based diabetes diagnostic and risk factor screening initiatives in Canada and Australia. Population groups were Australian Aborigines (n = 116), Torres Strait Islanders (n = 156), Native Canadians (n = 155), Greek migrants to Australia (n = 117), and Caucasian Australians (n = 67). Measurements included fasting glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) concentration, fasting and 2-h post-load glucose concentrations, body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio, and demographic variables. Results. Mean HbA(1c) concentrations were greater for indigenous groups than for Greek migrants and Caucasian Australians (P < 0.0001). The covariate adjusted indigenous versus non-indigenous difference (95% CI) was 0.90 (0.58-1.22) percentage units, 18.2% higher for indigenous people. Stratified analyses indicated greater HbA(1c) for indigenous than for non-indigenous persons with normoglycemia (P = 0.009), impaired glucose tolerance (P = 0.097), and diabetes (P < 0.0001). Conclusions. HbA(1c) concentrations are greater for indigenous than for non-indigenous groups. Social changes, low control, and living conditions associated with westernization may be inherently stressful at the biological level for indigenous populations in westernized countries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)405-413
Number of pages9
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Glycosylated Hemoglobin A
Population Groups
Population
Fasting
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Glucose Intolerance
Waist-Hip Ratio
Social Conditions
Social Change
Canada
Body Mass Index
Multivariate Analysis
Demography
Glucose

Cite this

Daniel, Mark ; O'Dea, Kerin ; Rowley, Kevin G. ; McDermott, Robyn ; Kelly, Shona. / Glycated hemoglobin as an indicator of social environmental stress among indigenous versus westernized populations. In: Preventive Medicine. 1999 ; Vol. 29, No. 5. pp. 405-413.
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Glycated hemoglobin as an indicator of social environmental stress among indigenous versus westernized populations. / Daniel, Mark; O'Dea, Kerin; Rowley, Kevin G.; McDermott, Robyn; Kelly, Shona.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 29, No. 5, 01.01.1999, p. 405-413.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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