Governance Through Community Partnerships: A Model for Public Funding of Private Schools in Australia

Christopher Aulich

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

    Abstract

    The provision of funds to non-government or private schools in Australia involves substantial sums of public monies, AUD$5,137m in 2001 (AEU 2002) from both state and federal governments. It has been, and still is, a public policy issue that generates considerable discussion and passion among the Australian community. This paper does not engage the ‘state aid’ debate, rather, it examines several different models of governance involved in the providing public funding for private schools. These models can be described in a variety of ways such as grants, subsidies, sponsorships, donations, joint investments, partnerships and contractual arrangements. The paper examines three of the more commonly considered models, grants, privatisation and community partnership, and explores how governance arrangements for each are typically treated in terms of relationships between partners, regulation and accountability.The term, ‘private’ is used to describe for-profit, not-for-profit, voluntary and other forms of service provision independent of the public sector. While this paper focuses on private provision of education services, it recognises that there are likely to be implications for public provision of these services in an environment where there is a limited total education budget.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication9th International Conference of the IPPS
    EditorsLuiz Montanheiro, Florian Kuznik, Artur Ochojski
    Place of PublicationUnited Kingdom
    PublisherSheffield Hallam University Press
    Pages1-12
    Number of pages12
    Volume8
    Edition2
    Publication statusPublished - 2003
    Event9th International Conference on Public-Private Sector Partnerships: Sustainable Success - Katowice, Poland
    Duration: 28 May 200331 May 2003

    Conference

    Conference9th International Conference on Public-Private Sector Partnerships: Sustainable Success
    CountryPoland
    CityKatowice
    Period28/05/0331/05/03

    Fingerprint

    private school
    funding
    governance
    grant
    profit
    private provision
    community
    partner relationship
    sponsorship
    donation
    Federal Government
    subsidy
    privatization
    education
    public sector
    budget
    money
    public policy
    regulation
    responsibility

    Cite this

    Aulich, C. (2003). Governance Through Community Partnerships: A Model for Public Funding of Private Schools in Australia. In L. Montanheiro, F. Kuznik, & A. Ochojski (Eds.), 9th International Conference of the IPPS (2 ed., Vol. 8, pp. 1-12). United Kingdom : Sheffield Hallam University Press.
    Aulich, Christopher. / Governance Through Community Partnerships: A Model for Public Funding of Private Schools in Australia. 9th International Conference of the IPPS. editor / Luiz Montanheiro ; Florian Kuznik ; Artur Ochojski. Vol. 8 2. ed. United Kingdom : Sheffield Hallam University Press, 2003. pp. 1-12
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    title = "Governance Through Community Partnerships: A Model for Public Funding of Private Schools in Australia",
    abstract = "The provision of funds to non-government or private schools in Australia involves substantial sums of public monies, AUD$5,137m in 2001 (AEU 2002) from both state and federal governments. It has been, and still is, a public policy issue that generates considerable discussion and passion among the Australian community. This paper does not engage the ‘state aid’ debate, rather, it examines several different models of governance involved in the providing public funding for private schools. These models can be described in a variety of ways such as grants, subsidies, sponsorships, donations, joint investments, partnerships and contractual arrangements. The paper examines three of the more commonly considered models, grants, privatisation and community partnership, and explores how governance arrangements for each are typically treated in terms of relationships between partners, regulation and accountability.The term, ‘private’ is used to describe for-profit, not-for-profit, voluntary and other forms of service provision independent of the public sector. While this paper focuses on private provision of education services, it recognises that there are likely to be implications for public provision of these services in an environment where there is a limited total education budget.",
    author = "Christopher Aulich",
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    Aulich, C 2003, Governance Through Community Partnerships: A Model for Public Funding of Private Schools in Australia. in L Montanheiro, F Kuznik & A Ochojski (eds), 9th International Conference of the IPPS. 2 edn, vol. 8, Sheffield Hallam University Press, United Kingdom , pp. 1-12, 9th International Conference on Public-Private Sector Partnerships: Sustainable Success, Katowice, Poland, 28/05/03.

    Governance Through Community Partnerships: A Model for Public Funding of Private Schools in Australia. / Aulich, Christopher.

    9th International Conference of the IPPS. ed. / Luiz Montanheiro; Florian Kuznik; Artur Ochojski. Vol. 8 2. ed. United Kingdom : Sheffield Hallam University Press, 2003. p. 1-12.

    Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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    T1 - Governance Through Community Partnerships: A Model for Public Funding of Private Schools in Australia

    AU - Aulich, Christopher

    PY - 2003

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    N2 - The provision of funds to non-government or private schools in Australia involves substantial sums of public monies, AUD$5,137m in 2001 (AEU 2002) from both state and federal governments. It has been, and still is, a public policy issue that generates considerable discussion and passion among the Australian community. This paper does not engage the ‘state aid’ debate, rather, it examines several different models of governance involved in the providing public funding for private schools. These models can be described in a variety of ways such as grants, subsidies, sponsorships, donations, joint investments, partnerships and contractual arrangements. The paper examines three of the more commonly considered models, grants, privatisation and community partnership, and explores how governance arrangements for each are typically treated in terms of relationships between partners, regulation and accountability.The term, ‘private’ is used to describe for-profit, not-for-profit, voluntary and other forms of service provision independent of the public sector. While this paper focuses on private provision of education services, it recognises that there are likely to be implications for public provision of these services in an environment where there is a limited total education budget.

    AB - The provision of funds to non-government or private schools in Australia involves substantial sums of public monies, AUD$5,137m in 2001 (AEU 2002) from both state and federal governments. It has been, and still is, a public policy issue that generates considerable discussion and passion among the Australian community. This paper does not engage the ‘state aid’ debate, rather, it examines several different models of governance involved in the providing public funding for private schools. These models can be described in a variety of ways such as grants, subsidies, sponsorships, donations, joint investments, partnerships and contractual arrangements. The paper examines three of the more commonly considered models, grants, privatisation and community partnership, and explores how governance arrangements for each are typically treated in terms of relationships between partners, regulation and accountability.The term, ‘private’ is used to describe for-profit, not-for-profit, voluntary and other forms of service provision independent of the public sector. While this paper focuses on private provision of education services, it recognises that there are likely to be implications for public provision of these services in an environment where there is a limited total education budget.

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    Aulich C. Governance Through Community Partnerships: A Model for Public Funding of Private Schools in Australia. In Montanheiro L, Kuznik F, Ochojski A, editors, 9th International Conference of the IPPS. 2 ed. Vol. 8. United Kingdom : Sheffield Hallam University Press. 2003. p. 1-12