Government-Business Relations

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

Abstract

The importance of the relationship between government and business is best captured in a rhetorical question: What is more important: strong government, prosperous business or civil society? The question is rhetorical because there is no correct answer. Strong government is necessary to provide a system of law and order; however, without prosperous businesses to pay taxes, it is difficult for government to collect the funds to perform its role. And civil society is necessary to hold governments and businesses to account; but if we take a Hobbesian1 view of human society, civil society cannot exist without strong government undertaking many essential roles, including political representation, public provision, and maintaining law and order, defence, public safety, regulation, infrastructure and trading relations. Of course, in a modern economy, all three institutions are necessary to ensure a society has an appropriate level of stability, security and living standards for its members.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAustralian Politics and Policy
EditorsPeter Chen, Nicholas Barry, John Butcher, David Clune, Ian Cook, Adele Garnier, Yvonne Haig, Sara Motta, Marija Taflaga
Place of PublicationAustralia
PublisherSydney University Press
Pages373-389
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9781743326671, 9781743326688
ISBN (Print)9781743326800
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2019

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civil society
law and order
living standard
taxes
infrastructure
regulation
economy
Society

Cite this

De Percy, M., & Batainah, H. (2019). Government-Business Relations. In P. Chen, N. Barry, J. Butcher, D. Clune, I. Cook, A. Garnier, Y. Haig, S. Motta, ... M. Taflaga (Eds.), Australian Politics and Policy (pp. 373-389). Australia: Sydney University Press. https://doi.org/10.30722/sup.9781743326671
De Percy, Michael ; Batainah, Heba. / Government-Business Relations. Australian Politics and Policy. editor / Peter Chen ; Nicholas Barry ; John Butcher ; David Clune ; Ian Cook ; Adele Garnier ; Yvonne Haig ; Sara Motta ; Marija Taflaga. Australia : Sydney University Press, 2019. pp. 373-389
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De Percy, M & Batainah, H 2019, Government-Business Relations. in P Chen, N Barry, J Butcher, D Clune, I Cook, A Garnier, Y Haig, S Motta & M Taflaga (eds), Australian Politics and Policy. Sydney University Press, Australia, pp. 373-389. https://doi.org/10.30722/sup.9781743326671

Government-Business Relations. / De Percy, Michael; Batainah, Heba.

Australian Politics and Policy. ed. / Peter Chen; Nicholas Barry; John Butcher; David Clune; Ian Cook; Adele Garnier; Yvonne Haig; Sara Motta; Marija Taflaga. Australia : Sydney University Press, 2019. p. 373-389.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

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De Percy M, Batainah H. Government-Business Relations. In Chen P, Barry N, Butcher J, Clune D, Cook I, Garnier A, Haig Y, Motta S, Taflaga M, editors, Australian Politics and Policy. Australia: Sydney University Press. 2019. p. 373-389 https://doi.org/10.30722/sup.9781743326671