Health Risk Assessment of Exposures to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons from Water and Fish Ingestion in Bayelsa State, Nigeria

Chukwunweike Ephraim-Emmanuel Benson, Okokon Enembe, Best Ordinioha

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: The harmful properties of many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, their capacity to bioaccumulate, and their persistence in the environment, have contributed in making exposures to these compounds to be an issue of great public health concern. This study assessed the health risks associated with PAHs exposure from the ingestion of fish and water in Bayelsa State.

Methods: This study utilized a comparative, cross-sectional design which was conducted in Bayelsa State. It involved 615 adults to whom a food frequency questionnaire was administered to elicit necessary data. PAHs concentrations of the fish and water were also obtained. The Statistical Package for Social Sciences version 25 was used to perform both descriptive and inferential analyses.

Results: Mean incremental lifetime cancer risk associated with the ingestion of fish and water in Sampou, Gbarain and Nembe were 0.010 ± 0.0019 × 10-3 and 0.3452 ± 0.1357 × 10-3; 0.0017 ± 0.0003 × 10-3 and 0.0636 ± 0.0351 × 10-3; 0.0064 ± 0.0014 × 10-3 and 0.0179 ± 0.0091 × 10-3 respectively. The mean hazard index and benzo[a]pyrene equivalents (B[a]Peq) associated with fish and water ingestion in the communities were also computed.

Conclusion: The health of the population in Sampou was slightly at risk for developing cancers due to PAHs exposures from the drinking of water. Constant biomonitoring of environmental media is necessary for ensuring the health of a populace.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Toxicology and Risk Assessment
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2023
Externally publishedYes

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