Health status, heat preparation strategies and medical events among elite cyclists who competed in the heat at the 2016 UCI Road World Cycling Championships in Qatar

Sebastien Racinais, David Nichols, Gavin Travers, Sebastien Moussay, Taoufik Belfekih, Abdulaziz Farooq, Yorck Olaf Schumacher, Julien D Périard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

PURPOSE: Assess the health status and heat preparation strategies of athletes competing in a World Cycling Championships held in hot ambient conditions (37°C, 25% relative humidity, wet-bulb-globe-temperature 27°C) and monitor the medical events arising during competition.

METHODS: 69 cyclists (~9% of the world championships participants) completed a pre-competition questionnaire. Illnesses and injuries encountered by the Athlete Medical Centre (AMC) were extracted from the race reports.

RESULTS: 22% of respondents reported illness symptoms in the 10 days preceding the Championships. 57% of respondents had previously experienced heat-related symptoms (cramping most commonly) while 17% had previously been diagnosed with exertional heat illness. 61% of the respondents had undergone some form of heat exposure prior to the Championships, with 38% acclimating for 5 to 30 days. In addition, several respondents declared to live in warm countries and all arrived in Qatar ~5 days prior to their event. 96% of the respondents used a pre-cooling strategy for the time trials and 74% did so before the road race (p<0.001), with ice vests being the most common. The AMC assessed 46 injuries and 26 illnesses in total, with three cyclists diagnosed with heat exhaustion.

CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of previous heat illness in elite cyclists calls for team and event organisation doctors to be trained on heat illness management, including early diagnosis and rapid on-site cooling. Some cyclists had been exposed to the heat prior to the Championships, but few had a dedicated plan, calling for additional education on the importance of heat acclimation. Pre-cooling was widely adopted.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Jan 2020

Fingerprint

Qatar
Health Status
Hot Temperature
Athletes
Heat Exhaustion
Acclimatization
Wounds and Injuries
Ice
Humidity
Surveys and Questionnaires
Early Diagnosis
Organizations
Education
Temperature

Cite this

Racinais, Sebastien ; Nichols, David ; Travers, Gavin ; Moussay, Sebastien ; Belfekih, Taoufik ; Farooq, Abdulaziz ; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf ; Périard, Julien D. / Health status, heat preparation strategies and medical events among elite cyclists who competed in the heat at the 2016 UCI Road World Cycling Championships in Qatar. In: British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2020 ; pp. 1-6.
@article{3f9116dda8b54e6eafe0f2db26ff1343,
title = "Health status, heat preparation strategies and medical events among elite cyclists who competed in the heat at the 2016 UCI Road World Cycling Championships in Qatar",
abstract = "PURPOSE: Assess the health status and heat preparation strategies of athletes competing in a World Cycling Championships held in hot ambient conditions (37°C, 25{\%} relative humidity, wet-bulb-globe-temperature 27°C) and monitor the medical events arising during competition.METHODS: 69 cyclists (~9{\%} of the world championships participants) completed a pre-competition questionnaire. Illnesses and injuries encountered by the Athlete Medical Centre (AMC) were extracted from the race reports.RESULTS: 22{\%} of respondents reported illness symptoms in the 10 days preceding the Championships. 57{\%} of respondents had previously experienced heat-related symptoms (cramping most commonly) while 17{\%} had previously been diagnosed with exertional heat illness. 61{\%} of the respondents had undergone some form of heat exposure prior to the Championships, with 38{\%} acclimating for 5 to 30 days. In addition, several respondents declared to live in warm countries and all arrived in Qatar ~5 days prior to their event. 96{\%} of the respondents used a pre-cooling strategy for the time trials and 74{\%} did so before the road race (p<0.001), with ice vests being the most common. The AMC assessed 46 injuries and 26 illnesses in total, with three cyclists diagnosed with heat exhaustion.CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of previous heat illness in elite cyclists calls for team and event organisation doctors to be trained on heat illness management, including early diagnosis and rapid on-site cooling. Some cyclists had been exposed to the heat prior to the Championships, but few had a dedicated plan, calling for additional education on the importance of heat acclimation. Pre-cooling was widely adopted.",
author = "Sebastien Racinais and David Nichols and Gavin Travers and Sebastien Moussay and Taoufik Belfekih and Abdulaziz Farooq and Schumacher, {Yorck Olaf} and P{\'e}riard, {Julien D}",
note = "{\circledC} Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions.",
year = "2020",
month = "1",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1136/bjsports-2019-100781",
language = "English",
pages = "1--6",
journal = "British Journal of Sports Medicine",
issn = "0306-3674",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",

}

Health status, heat preparation strategies and medical events among elite cyclists who competed in the heat at the 2016 UCI Road World Cycling Championships in Qatar. / Racinais, Sebastien; Nichols, David; Travers, Gavin; Moussay, Sebastien; Belfekih, Taoufik; Farooq, Abdulaziz; Schumacher, Yorck Olaf; Périard, Julien D.

In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, 28.01.2020, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Health status, heat preparation strategies and medical events among elite cyclists who competed in the heat at the 2016 UCI Road World Cycling Championships in Qatar

AU - Racinais, Sebastien

AU - Nichols, David

AU - Travers, Gavin

AU - Moussay, Sebastien

AU - Belfekih, Taoufik

AU - Farooq, Abdulaziz

AU - Schumacher, Yorck Olaf

AU - Périard, Julien D

N1 - © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2020. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions.

PY - 2020/1/28

Y1 - 2020/1/28

N2 - PURPOSE: Assess the health status and heat preparation strategies of athletes competing in a World Cycling Championships held in hot ambient conditions (37°C, 25% relative humidity, wet-bulb-globe-temperature 27°C) and monitor the medical events arising during competition.METHODS: 69 cyclists (~9% of the world championships participants) completed a pre-competition questionnaire. Illnesses and injuries encountered by the Athlete Medical Centre (AMC) were extracted from the race reports.RESULTS: 22% of respondents reported illness symptoms in the 10 days preceding the Championships. 57% of respondents had previously experienced heat-related symptoms (cramping most commonly) while 17% had previously been diagnosed with exertional heat illness. 61% of the respondents had undergone some form of heat exposure prior to the Championships, with 38% acclimating for 5 to 30 days. In addition, several respondents declared to live in warm countries and all arrived in Qatar ~5 days prior to their event. 96% of the respondents used a pre-cooling strategy for the time trials and 74% did so before the road race (p<0.001), with ice vests being the most common. The AMC assessed 46 injuries and 26 illnesses in total, with three cyclists diagnosed with heat exhaustion.CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of previous heat illness in elite cyclists calls for team and event organisation doctors to be trained on heat illness management, including early diagnosis and rapid on-site cooling. Some cyclists had been exposed to the heat prior to the Championships, but few had a dedicated plan, calling for additional education on the importance of heat acclimation. Pre-cooling was widely adopted.

AB - PURPOSE: Assess the health status and heat preparation strategies of athletes competing in a World Cycling Championships held in hot ambient conditions (37°C, 25% relative humidity, wet-bulb-globe-temperature 27°C) and monitor the medical events arising during competition.METHODS: 69 cyclists (~9% of the world championships participants) completed a pre-competition questionnaire. Illnesses and injuries encountered by the Athlete Medical Centre (AMC) were extracted from the race reports.RESULTS: 22% of respondents reported illness symptoms in the 10 days preceding the Championships. 57% of respondents had previously experienced heat-related symptoms (cramping most commonly) while 17% had previously been diagnosed with exertional heat illness. 61% of the respondents had undergone some form of heat exposure prior to the Championships, with 38% acclimating for 5 to 30 days. In addition, several respondents declared to live in warm countries and all arrived in Qatar ~5 days prior to their event. 96% of the respondents used a pre-cooling strategy for the time trials and 74% did so before the road race (p<0.001), with ice vests being the most common. The AMC assessed 46 injuries and 26 illnesses in total, with three cyclists diagnosed with heat exhaustion.CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of previous heat illness in elite cyclists calls for team and event organisation doctors to be trained on heat illness management, including early diagnosis and rapid on-site cooling. Some cyclists had been exposed to the heat prior to the Championships, but few had a dedicated plan, calling for additional education on the importance of heat acclimation. Pre-cooling was widely adopted.

U2 - 10.1136/bjsports-2019-100781

DO - 10.1136/bjsports-2019-100781

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 6

JO - British Journal of Sports Medicine

JF - British Journal of Sports Medicine

SN - 0306-3674

ER -