Heat stress does not exacerbate tennis-induced alterations in physical performance

Olivier Girard, Ryan J. Christian, Sébastien Racinais, Julien D. Périard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives To assess the time course of changes in physical performance in response to match-play tennis under heat stress. Methods Two matches consisting of 20 min of effective playing time (2×10 min segments) were played in COOL (∼102 min; ∼22°C and 70% relative humidity (RH)) and HOT (∼119 min; ∼36°C and 35% RH) environments. Repeated-sprint ability (3×15 m, 15 s rest), 15 m sprint time with a direction change (180°), vertical jump height (squat and countermovement jumps) and leg stiffness (multirebound jumps) were assessed in 12 competitive male players prematch, midmatch and postmatch, and 24 and 48 h after match completion. Results During the repeated-sprint ability test, initial (+2.3% and +3.1%) and cumulated sprint (+1.5% and +2.8%) times increased from prematch to midmatch and postmatch, respectively (p<0.001), while the sprint decrement score did not change. Match-play tennis induced a slowing (average of both conditions: +1.1% and +1.3% at midmatch and postmatch time points; p=0.05) of 15 m sprint time with direction change. Compared with prematch, leg stiffness (.6.4% and .6.5%; p<0.001) and squat jump height (.1.5% and .2.4%; p=0.05), but not countermovement jump height (.0.7% and .1.3%; p>0.05), decreased midmatch and postmatch, respectively, regardless of the condition. Complete recovery in all physical performance markers occurred within 24 h. Conclusions In tennis, match-related fatigue is characterised by impaired repeated-sprint ability, explosive power and leg stiffness at midmatch and postmatch, with values restored to prematch baseline 24 h into recovery. In addition, physical performance responses (match and recovery kinetics) are identical when competing in cool and hot environments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-6
JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume48
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Tennis
Hot Temperature
Humidity
Leg
Fatigue

Cite this

Girard, Olivier ; Christian, Ryan J. ; Racinais, Sébastien ; Périard, Julien D. / Heat stress does not exacerbate tennis-induced alterations in physical performance. In: British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 48, No. SUPPL. 1. pp. 1-6.
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abstract = "Objectives To assess the time course of changes in physical performance in response to match-play tennis under heat stress. Methods Two matches consisting of 20 min of effective playing time (2×10 min segments) were played in COOL (∼102 min; ∼22°C and 70{\%} relative humidity (RH)) and HOT (∼119 min; ∼36°C and 35{\%} RH) environments. Repeated-sprint ability (3×15 m, 15 s rest), 15 m sprint time with a direction change (180°), vertical jump height (squat and countermovement jumps) and leg stiffness (multirebound jumps) were assessed in 12 competitive male players prematch, midmatch and postmatch, and 24 and 48 h after match completion. Results During the repeated-sprint ability test, initial (+2.3{\%} and +3.1{\%}) and cumulated sprint (+1.5{\%} and +2.8{\%}) times increased from prematch to midmatch and postmatch, respectively (p<0.001), while the sprint decrement score did not change. Match-play tennis induced a slowing (average of both conditions: +1.1{\%} and +1.3{\%} at midmatch and postmatch time points; p=0.05) of 15 m sprint time with direction change. Compared with prematch, leg stiffness (.6.4{\%} and .6.5{\%}; p<0.001) and squat jump height (.1.5{\%} and .2.4{\%}; p=0.05), but not countermovement jump height (.0.7{\%} and .1.3{\%}; p>0.05), decreased midmatch and postmatch, respectively, regardless of the condition. Complete recovery in all physical performance markers occurred within 24 h. Conclusions In tennis, match-related fatigue is characterised by impaired repeated-sprint ability, explosive power and leg stiffness at midmatch and postmatch, with values restored to prematch baseline 24 h into recovery. In addition, physical performance responses (match and recovery kinetics) are identical when competing in cool and hot environments.",
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Heat stress does not exacerbate tennis-induced alterations in physical performance. / Girard, Olivier; Christian, Ryan J.; Racinais, Sébastien; Périard, Julien D.

In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 48, No. SUPPL. 1, 2014, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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N2 - Objectives To assess the time course of changes in physical performance in response to match-play tennis under heat stress. Methods Two matches consisting of 20 min of effective playing time (2×10 min segments) were played in COOL (∼102 min; ∼22°C and 70% relative humidity (RH)) and HOT (∼119 min; ∼36°C and 35% RH) environments. Repeated-sprint ability (3×15 m, 15 s rest), 15 m sprint time with a direction change (180°), vertical jump height (squat and countermovement jumps) and leg stiffness (multirebound jumps) were assessed in 12 competitive male players prematch, midmatch and postmatch, and 24 and 48 h after match completion. Results During the repeated-sprint ability test, initial (+2.3% and +3.1%) and cumulated sprint (+1.5% and +2.8%) times increased from prematch to midmatch and postmatch, respectively (p<0.001), while the sprint decrement score did not change. Match-play tennis induced a slowing (average of both conditions: +1.1% and +1.3% at midmatch and postmatch time points; p=0.05) of 15 m sprint time with direction change. Compared with prematch, leg stiffness (.6.4% and .6.5%; p<0.001) and squat jump height (.1.5% and .2.4%; p=0.05), but not countermovement jump height (.0.7% and .1.3%; p>0.05), decreased midmatch and postmatch, respectively, regardless of the condition. Complete recovery in all physical performance markers occurred within 24 h. Conclusions In tennis, match-related fatigue is characterised by impaired repeated-sprint ability, explosive power and leg stiffness at midmatch and postmatch, with values restored to prematch baseline 24 h into recovery. In addition, physical performance responses (match and recovery kinetics) are identical when competing in cool and hot environments.

AB - Objectives To assess the time course of changes in physical performance in response to match-play tennis under heat stress. Methods Two matches consisting of 20 min of effective playing time (2×10 min segments) were played in COOL (∼102 min; ∼22°C and 70% relative humidity (RH)) and HOT (∼119 min; ∼36°C and 35% RH) environments. Repeated-sprint ability (3×15 m, 15 s rest), 15 m sprint time with a direction change (180°), vertical jump height (squat and countermovement jumps) and leg stiffness (multirebound jumps) were assessed in 12 competitive male players prematch, midmatch and postmatch, and 24 and 48 h after match completion. Results During the repeated-sprint ability test, initial (+2.3% and +3.1%) and cumulated sprint (+1.5% and +2.8%) times increased from prematch to midmatch and postmatch, respectively (p<0.001), while the sprint decrement score did not change. Match-play tennis induced a slowing (average of both conditions: +1.1% and +1.3% at midmatch and postmatch time points; p=0.05) of 15 m sprint time with direction change. Compared with prematch, leg stiffness (.6.4% and .6.5%; p<0.001) and squat jump height (.1.5% and .2.4%; p=0.05), but not countermovement jump height (.0.7% and .1.3%; p>0.05), decreased midmatch and postmatch, respectively, regardless of the condition. Complete recovery in all physical performance markers occurred within 24 h. Conclusions In tennis, match-related fatigue is characterised by impaired repeated-sprint ability, explosive power and leg stiffness at midmatch and postmatch, with values restored to prematch baseline 24 h into recovery. In addition, physical performance responses (match and recovery kinetics) are identical when competing in cool and hot environments.

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