Helmets

What do Snowsport Instructors and Guests Know and Expect?

F. Anne Terwiel, Tracey DICKSON

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Snowsport participants are donning helmets in ever-greater numbers at a time when there is an increasing interest in the long-term impact of repeated concussive and sub-concussive impacts in sport. This interest has been fanned by a wide-reaching media discussion of concussion related to sport injuries, and there have been calls to make helmet use mandatory for snowsport participants. Helmets have been shown to be effective in protecting against lacerations and skull fractures, but there is little evidence that there is a protective effect with regard to concussion. Against that backdrop, the authors were curious as to what snowsport instructors and the general public thinks the risk level of snowsport is, what they believe their helmets will do for them within that risk environment, reasons for helmet use, and whether there is greater knowledge amongst snowsport instructors than the general public. The main reasons for helmet use were linked to safety, while the main reasons for non-helmet use were linked to lack of comfort, reduction in sensory awareness, and a lack of belief in the effectiveness of helmets. Respondents tended to vastly overrate the risk of injury and also to overrate the effectiveness of helmets. There was very little difference in the knowledge level of snowsport instructors and the general public. The snowsport industry would benefit from an education program aimed at both industry professionals and the general public as to the actual risk associated with snowsport participation, and with regard to how effective helmets really are in protecting against concussion.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSkiing Trauma and Safety
Subtitle of host publication20th Volume
EditorsRobert J. Johnson, Jasper E. Shealy, Richard M. Greenwald
Place of PublicationBay Shore, USA
PublisherASTM International
Pages3-21
Number of pages19
Volume20
ISBN (Print)9780803176096
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Event20th International Society for Skiing Safety Congress - Bariloche, Bariloche, Argentina
Duration: 4 Aug 201310 Aug 2013

Conference

Conference20th International Society for Skiing Safety Congress
CountryArgentina
CityBariloche
Period4/08/1310/08/13

Fingerprint

Sports
Industry
Education

Cite this

Terwiel, F. A., & DICKSON, T. (2015). Helmets: What do Snowsport Instructors and Guests Know and Expect? In R. J. Johnson, J. E. Shealy, & R. M. Greenwald (Eds.), Skiing Trauma and Safety: 20th Volume (Vol. 20, pp. 3-21). Bay Shore, USA: ASTM International. https://doi.org/10.1520/STP158220140008
Terwiel, F. Anne ; DICKSON, Tracey. / Helmets : What do Snowsport Instructors and Guests Know and Expect?. Skiing Trauma and Safety: 20th Volume. editor / Robert J. Johnson ; Jasper E. Shealy ; Richard M. Greenwald. Vol. 20 Bay Shore, USA : ASTM International, 2015. pp. 3-21
@inproceedings{7bc97c2983b3424587ed489caf1aa9b3,
title = "Helmets: What do Snowsport Instructors and Guests Know and Expect?",
abstract = "Snowsport participants are donning helmets in ever-greater numbers at a time when there is an increasing interest in the long-term impact of repeated concussive and sub-concussive impacts in sport. This interest has been fanned by a wide-reaching media discussion of concussion related to sport injuries, and there have been calls to make helmet use mandatory for snowsport participants. Helmets have been shown to be effective in protecting against lacerations and skull fractures, but there is little evidence that there is a protective effect with regard to concussion. Against that backdrop, the authors were curious as to what snowsport instructors and the general public thinks the risk level of snowsport is, what they believe their helmets will do for them within that risk environment, reasons for helmet use, and whether there is greater knowledge amongst snowsport instructors than the general public. The main reasons for helmet use were linked to safety, while the main reasons for non-helmet use were linked to lack of comfort, reduction in sensory awareness, and a lack of belief in the effectiveness of helmets. Respondents tended to vastly overrate the risk of injury and also to overrate the effectiveness of helmets. There was very little difference in the knowledge level of snowsport instructors and the general public. The snowsport industry would benefit from an education program aimed at both industry professionals and the general public as to the actual risk associated with snowsport participation, and with regard to how effective helmets really are in protecting against concussion.",
keywords = "Snowsport, helmets, risk, knowledge, public, instructors, speed, Speed, Risk, Public, Knowledge, Instructors, Helmets",
author = "Terwiel, {F. Anne} and Tracey DICKSON",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1520/STP158220140008",
language = "English",
isbn = "9780803176096",
volume = "20",
pages = "3--21",
editor = "Johnson, {Robert J.} and Shealy, {Jasper E.} and Greenwald, {Richard M.}",
booktitle = "Skiing Trauma and Safety",
publisher = "ASTM International",

}

Terwiel, FA & DICKSON, T 2015, Helmets: What do Snowsport Instructors and Guests Know and Expect? in RJ Johnson, JE Shealy & RM Greenwald (eds), Skiing Trauma and Safety: 20th Volume. vol. 20, ASTM International, Bay Shore, USA, pp. 3-21, 20th International Society for Skiing Safety Congress, Bariloche, Argentina, 4/08/13. https://doi.org/10.1520/STP158220140008

Helmets : What do Snowsport Instructors and Guests Know and Expect? / Terwiel, F. Anne; DICKSON, Tracey.

Skiing Trauma and Safety: 20th Volume. ed. / Robert J. Johnson; Jasper E. Shealy; Richard M. Greenwald. Vol. 20 Bay Shore, USA : ASTM International, 2015. p. 3-21.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

TY - GEN

T1 - Helmets

T2 - What do Snowsport Instructors and Guests Know and Expect?

AU - Terwiel, F. Anne

AU - DICKSON, Tracey

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Snowsport participants are donning helmets in ever-greater numbers at a time when there is an increasing interest in the long-term impact of repeated concussive and sub-concussive impacts in sport. This interest has been fanned by a wide-reaching media discussion of concussion related to sport injuries, and there have been calls to make helmet use mandatory for snowsport participants. Helmets have been shown to be effective in protecting against lacerations and skull fractures, but there is little evidence that there is a protective effect with regard to concussion. Against that backdrop, the authors were curious as to what snowsport instructors and the general public thinks the risk level of snowsport is, what they believe their helmets will do for them within that risk environment, reasons for helmet use, and whether there is greater knowledge amongst snowsport instructors than the general public. The main reasons for helmet use were linked to safety, while the main reasons for non-helmet use were linked to lack of comfort, reduction in sensory awareness, and a lack of belief in the effectiveness of helmets. Respondents tended to vastly overrate the risk of injury and also to overrate the effectiveness of helmets. There was very little difference in the knowledge level of snowsport instructors and the general public. The snowsport industry would benefit from an education program aimed at both industry professionals and the general public as to the actual risk associated with snowsport participation, and with regard to how effective helmets really are in protecting against concussion.

AB - Snowsport participants are donning helmets in ever-greater numbers at a time when there is an increasing interest in the long-term impact of repeated concussive and sub-concussive impacts in sport. This interest has been fanned by a wide-reaching media discussion of concussion related to sport injuries, and there have been calls to make helmet use mandatory for snowsport participants. Helmets have been shown to be effective in protecting against lacerations and skull fractures, but there is little evidence that there is a protective effect with regard to concussion. Against that backdrop, the authors were curious as to what snowsport instructors and the general public thinks the risk level of snowsport is, what they believe their helmets will do for them within that risk environment, reasons for helmet use, and whether there is greater knowledge amongst snowsport instructors than the general public. The main reasons for helmet use were linked to safety, while the main reasons for non-helmet use were linked to lack of comfort, reduction in sensory awareness, and a lack of belief in the effectiveness of helmets. Respondents tended to vastly overrate the risk of injury and also to overrate the effectiveness of helmets. There was very little difference in the knowledge level of snowsport instructors and the general public. The snowsport industry would benefit from an education program aimed at both industry professionals and the general public as to the actual risk associated with snowsport participation, and with regard to how effective helmets really are in protecting against concussion.

KW - Snowsport

KW - helmets

KW - risk

KW - knowledge

KW - public

KW - instructors

KW - speed

KW - Speed

KW - Risk

KW - Public

KW - Knowledge

KW - Instructors

KW - Helmets

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84930365693&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/helmets-snowsport-instructors-guests-know-expect

U2 - 10.1520/STP158220140008

DO - 10.1520/STP158220140008

M3 - Conference contribution

SN - 9780803176096

VL - 20

SP - 3

EP - 21

BT - Skiing Trauma and Safety

A2 - Johnson, Robert J.

A2 - Shealy, Jasper E.

A2 - Greenwald, Richard M.

PB - ASTM International

CY - Bay Shore, USA

ER -

Terwiel FA, DICKSON T. Helmets: What do Snowsport Instructors and Guests Know and Expect? In Johnson RJ, Shealy JE, Greenwald RM, editors, Skiing Trauma and Safety: 20th Volume. Vol. 20. Bay Shore, USA: ASTM International. 2015. p. 3-21 https://doi.org/10.1520/STP158220140008