High-intensity interval training versus continuous moderate intensity training

Effects on health outcomes and cardiometabolic disease risk factors in cancer survivors: A pilot study

Kellie TOOHEY, Stuart SEMPLE, Kate PUMPA, Julie COOKE, Leonard Arnold, Paul Craft, Desmond YIP

Research output: Contribution to conference (non-published works)Abstract

Abstract

Background: It is well established that cancer survivors are at an increased risk for developing cardiometabolic disease (CMD). Currently it is unknown if continuous moderate intensity training (CMIT) or high intensity interval training (HIIT) is more effective in eliminating this risk as such, the aim of this pilot study was to contrast the effects of HIIT versus CMIT on CMD risk and other health related outcomes.

Methods: Cancer survivors were randomly assigned into a high (n = 8) or moderate (n = 8) intensity 36 session (12 week) supervised exercise program. The HIIT group performed interval training (≥85% maximal heart rate) and the moderate intensity group (MIG) performed continuous aerobic training (≥55% maximal heart rate).

Results: Significant changes in quality of life (QoL) and waist circumference (WC) in the moderate intensity group (MIG) (QoL p = 0.04; WC p = 0.03) and QoL, (HC), six minute walk test (6MWT), sit to stand (STS), mean arterial pressure (MAP), central systolic pressure (CSP), pulse pressure (PP), central diastolic pressure (CDP) insulin reduction, hip circumference (HC) and WC (QoL p = 0.01; 6MWT p = 0.01; STS p = 0.01; MAP p = 0.04; CSP p = 0.01; PP p = 0.02; CDP p = 0.04; insulin p = 0.03; HC p = 0.04; WC p = 0.01) in the high intensity group (HIG).

Discussion: The results from this pilot study show that high intensity interval training is well received and imparts favourable benefits for exercising cancer survivors. A larger sample size is required to confirm the significance of these findings
Original languageEnglish
Pages94-94
Number of pages1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
EventHeart Foundation: Cardiovascular Research Symposium - Canberra, Australia
Duration: 5 May 2017 → …

Conference

ConferenceHeart Foundation
CountryAustralia
CityCanberra
Period5/05/17 → …

Fingerprint

Survivors
Waist Circumference
Blood Pressure
Health
Quality of Life
Hip
Neoplasms
Arterial Pressure
Heart Rate
Insulin
Sample Size
High-Intensity Interval Training
Exercise

Cite this

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title = "High-intensity interval training versus continuous moderate intensity training: Effects on health outcomes and cardiometabolic disease risk factors in cancer survivors: A pilot study",
abstract = "Background: It is well established that cancer survivors are at an increased risk for developing cardiometabolic disease (CMD). Currently it is unknown if continuous moderate intensity training (CMIT) or high intensity interval training (HIIT) is more effective in eliminating this risk as such, the aim of this pilot study was to contrast the effects of HIIT versus CMIT on CMD risk and other health related outcomes.Methods: Cancer survivors were randomly assigned into a high (n = 8) or moderate (n = 8) intensity 36 session (12 week) supervised exercise program. The HIIT group performed interval training (≥85{\%} maximal heart rate) and the moderate intensity group (MIG) performed continuous aerobic training (≥55{\%} maximal heart rate).Results: Significant changes in quality of life (QoL) and waist circumference (WC) in the moderate intensity group (MIG) (QoL p = 0.04; WC p = 0.03) and QoL, (HC), six minute walk test (6MWT), sit to stand (STS), mean arterial pressure (MAP), central systolic pressure (CSP), pulse pressure (PP), central diastolic pressure (CDP) insulin reduction, hip circumference (HC) and WC (QoL p = 0.01; 6MWT p = 0.01; STS p = 0.01; MAP p = 0.04; CSP p = 0.01; PP p = 0.02; CDP p = 0.04; insulin p = 0.03; HC p = 0.04; WC p = 0.01) in the high intensity group (HIG).Discussion: The results from this pilot study show that high intensity interval training is well received and imparts favourable benefits for exercising cancer survivors. A larger sample size is required to confirm the significance of these findings",
author = "Kellie TOOHEY and Stuart SEMPLE and Kate PUMPA and Julie COOKE and Leonard Arnold and Paul Craft and Desmond YIP",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1016/j.jsams.2015.12.359",
language = "English",
pages = "94--94",
note = "Heart Foundation : Cardiovascular Research Symposium ; Conference date: 05-05-2017",

}

High-intensity interval training versus continuous moderate intensity training : Effects on health outcomes and cardiometabolic disease risk factors in cancer survivors: A pilot study. / TOOHEY, Kellie; SEMPLE, Stuart; PUMPA, Kate; COOKE, Julie; Arnold, Leonard; Craft, Paul; YIP, Desmond.

2015. 94-94 Abstract from Heart Foundation, Canberra, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conference (non-published works)Abstract

TY - CONF

T1 - High-intensity interval training versus continuous moderate intensity training

T2 - Effects on health outcomes and cardiometabolic disease risk factors in cancer survivors: A pilot study

AU - TOOHEY, Kellie

AU - SEMPLE, Stuart

AU - PUMPA, Kate

AU - COOKE, Julie

AU - Arnold, Leonard

AU - Craft, Paul

AU - YIP, Desmond

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Background: It is well established that cancer survivors are at an increased risk for developing cardiometabolic disease (CMD). Currently it is unknown if continuous moderate intensity training (CMIT) or high intensity interval training (HIIT) is more effective in eliminating this risk as such, the aim of this pilot study was to contrast the effects of HIIT versus CMIT on CMD risk and other health related outcomes.Methods: Cancer survivors were randomly assigned into a high (n = 8) or moderate (n = 8) intensity 36 session (12 week) supervised exercise program. The HIIT group performed interval training (≥85% maximal heart rate) and the moderate intensity group (MIG) performed continuous aerobic training (≥55% maximal heart rate).Results: Significant changes in quality of life (QoL) and waist circumference (WC) in the moderate intensity group (MIG) (QoL p = 0.04; WC p = 0.03) and QoL, (HC), six minute walk test (6MWT), sit to stand (STS), mean arterial pressure (MAP), central systolic pressure (CSP), pulse pressure (PP), central diastolic pressure (CDP) insulin reduction, hip circumference (HC) and WC (QoL p = 0.01; 6MWT p = 0.01; STS p = 0.01; MAP p = 0.04; CSP p = 0.01; PP p = 0.02; CDP p = 0.04; insulin p = 0.03; HC p = 0.04; WC p = 0.01) in the high intensity group (HIG).Discussion: The results from this pilot study show that high intensity interval training is well received and imparts favourable benefits for exercising cancer survivors. A larger sample size is required to confirm the significance of these findings

AB - Background: It is well established that cancer survivors are at an increased risk for developing cardiometabolic disease (CMD). Currently it is unknown if continuous moderate intensity training (CMIT) or high intensity interval training (HIIT) is more effective in eliminating this risk as such, the aim of this pilot study was to contrast the effects of HIIT versus CMIT on CMD risk and other health related outcomes.Methods: Cancer survivors were randomly assigned into a high (n = 8) or moderate (n = 8) intensity 36 session (12 week) supervised exercise program. The HIIT group performed interval training (≥85% maximal heart rate) and the moderate intensity group (MIG) performed continuous aerobic training (≥55% maximal heart rate).Results: Significant changes in quality of life (QoL) and waist circumference (WC) in the moderate intensity group (MIG) (QoL p = 0.04; WC p = 0.03) and QoL, (HC), six minute walk test (6MWT), sit to stand (STS), mean arterial pressure (MAP), central systolic pressure (CSP), pulse pressure (PP), central diastolic pressure (CDP) insulin reduction, hip circumference (HC) and WC (QoL p = 0.01; 6MWT p = 0.01; STS p = 0.01; MAP p = 0.04; CSP p = 0.01; PP p = 0.02; CDP p = 0.04; insulin p = 0.03; HC p = 0.04; WC p = 0.01) in the high intensity group (HIG).Discussion: The results from this pilot study show that high intensity interval training is well received and imparts favourable benefits for exercising cancer survivors. A larger sample size is required to confirm the significance of these findings

U2 - 10.1016/j.jsams.2015.12.359

DO - 10.1016/j.jsams.2015.12.359

M3 - Abstract

SP - 94

EP - 94

ER -