High-Tech Outsourcing: A benefit-cost Framework

Cameron Gordon, Alan Zimmerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Is international outsourcing “efficient” or merely a redistribution of resources from one economic sector to another? This paper looks at this question from the perspectives of: (1) economic theory, which abstracts away from institutions and towards generalized incentives; (2) management theory, which focuses more on institutional issues that economic theory tends to ignore; and (3) a combined perspective within a benefit-cost analysis framework. The paper argues that an evaluation of outsourcing's impacts requires determining how the practice affects overall size of economic output and equity across sectors and countries. A benefit-cost template is developed for considering these questions more systematically
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-105
Number of pages9
JournalThe American Economist
Volume51
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Fingerprint

High-tech
Economic theory
Outsourcing
Benefit-cost
Economic sectors
Incentives
Redistribution
Equity
Resources
Management theory
Evaluation
Benefit-cost analysis
Template
Economics
International outsourcing

Cite this

Gordon, C., & Zimmerman, A. (2007). High-Tech Outsourcing: A benefit-cost Framework. The American Economist, 51(1), 97-105.
Gordon, Cameron ; Zimmerman, Alan. / High-Tech Outsourcing: A benefit-cost Framework. In: The American Economist. 2007 ; Vol. 51, No. 1. pp. 97-105.
@article{24bd32313a94413c85dbe87c53d7a689,
title = "High-Tech Outsourcing: A benefit-cost Framework",
abstract = "Is international outsourcing “efficient” or merely a redistribution of resources from one economic sector to another? This paper looks at this question from the perspectives of: (1) economic theory, which abstracts away from institutions and towards generalized incentives; (2) management theory, which focuses more on institutional issues that economic theory tends to ignore; and (3) a combined perspective within a benefit-cost analysis framework. The paper argues that an evaluation of outsourcing's impacts requires determining how the practice affects overall size of economic output and equity across sectors and countries. A benefit-cost template is developed for considering these questions more systematically",
author = "Cameron Gordon and Alan Zimmerman",
year = "2007",
language = "English",
volume = "51",
pages = "97--105",
journal = "The American Economist",
issn = "0569-4345",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "1",

}

Gordon, C & Zimmerman, A 2007, 'High-Tech Outsourcing: A benefit-cost Framework', The American Economist, vol. 51, no. 1, pp. 97-105.

High-Tech Outsourcing: A benefit-cost Framework. / Gordon, Cameron; Zimmerman, Alan.

In: The American Economist, Vol. 51, No. 1, 2007, p. 97-105.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - High-Tech Outsourcing: A benefit-cost Framework

AU - Gordon, Cameron

AU - Zimmerman, Alan

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - Is international outsourcing “efficient” or merely a redistribution of resources from one economic sector to another? This paper looks at this question from the perspectives of: (1) economic theory, which abstracts away from institutions and towards generalized incentives; (2) management theory, which focuses more on institutional issues that economic theory tends to ignore; and (3) a combined perspective within a benefit-cost analysis framework. The paper argues that an evaluation of outsourcing's impacts requires determining how the practice affects overall size of economic output and equity across sectors and countries. A benefit-cost template is developed for considering these questions more systematically

AB - Is international outsourcing “efficient” or merely a redistribution of resources from one economic sector to another? This paper looks at this question from the perspectives of: (1) economic theory, which abstracts away from institutions and towards generalized incentives; (2) management theory, which focuses more on institutional issues that economic theory tends to ignore; and (3) a combined perspective within a benefit-cost analysis framework. The paper argues that an evaluation of outsourcing's impacts requires determining how the practice affects overall size of economic output and equity across sectors and countries. A benefit-cost template is developed for considering these questions more systematically

M3 - Article

VL - 51

SP - 97

EP - 105

JO - The American Economist

JF - The American Economist

SN - 0569-4345

IS - 1

ER -