Human-induced biotic invasions and changes in plankton interaction networks

Pavel Kratina, Ralph MAC NALLY, Wim Kimmerer, Jim THOMSON, Monika Winder

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    8 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Pervasive and accelerating changes to ecosystems due to human activities remain major sources of uncertainty in predicting the structure and dynamics of ecological communities. Understanding which biotic interactions within natural multitrophic communities are weakened or augmented by invasions of non-native species in the context of other environmental pressures is needed for effective management. We used multivariate autoregressive models with detailed time-series data from largely freshwater and brackish regions of the upper San Francisco Estuary to assess the topology, direction and strength of trophic interactions following major invasions and establishment of non-native zooplankton in the early 1990s. We simultaneously compared the effects of fish and clam predation, environmental temperature and salinity intrusion using time-series data from >60 monitoring locations spanning more than three decades.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1066-1074
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Applied Ecology
    Volume51
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    plankton
    time series
    trophic interaction
    topology
    zooplankton
    human activity
    predation
    estuary
    salinity
    ecosystem
    monitoring
    fish
    temperature
    ecological community
    effect

    Cite this

    Kratina, Pavel ; MAC NALLY, Ralph ; Kimmerer, Wim ; THOMSON, Jim ; Winder, Monika. / Human-induced biotic invasions and changes in plankton interaction networks. In: Journal of Applied Ecology. 2014 ; Vol. 51, No. 4. pp. 1066-1074.
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    abstract = "Pervasive and accelerating changes to ecosystems due to human activities remain major sources of uncertainty in predicting the structure and dynamics of ecological communities. Understanding which biotic interactions within natural multitrophic communities are weakened or augmented by invasions of non-native species in the context of other environmental pressures is needed for effective management. We used multivariate autoregressive models with detailed time-series data from largely freshwater and brackish regions of the upper San Francisco Estuary to assess the topology, direction and strength of trophic interactions following major invasions and establishment of non-native zooplankton in the early 1990s. We simultaneously compared the effects of fish and clam predation, environmental temperature and salinity intrusion using time-series data from >60 monitoring locations spanning more than three decades.",
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    author = "Pavel Kratina and {MAC NALLY}, Ralph and Wim Kimmerer and Jim THOMSON and Monika Winder",
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    Human-induced biotic invasions and changes in plankton interaction networks. / Kratina, Pavel; MAC NALLY, Ralph; Kimmerer, Wim; THOMSON, Jim; Winder, Monika.

    In: Journal of Applied Ecology, Vol. 51, No. 4, 2014, p. 1066-1074.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    T1 - Human-induced biotic invasions and changes in plankton interaction networks

    AU - Kratina, Pavel

    AU - MAC NALLY, Ralph

    AU - Kimmerer, Wim

    AU - THOMSON, Jim

    AU - Winder, Monika

    PY - 2014

    Y1 - 2014

    N2 - Pervasive and accelerating changes to ecosystems due to human activities remain major sources of uncertainty in predicting the structure and dynamics of ecological communities. Understanding which biotic interactions within natural multitrophic communities are weakened or augmented by invasions of non-native species in the context of other environmental pressures is needed for effective management. We used multivariate autoregressive models with detailed time-series data from largely freshwater and brackish regions of the upper San Francisco Estuary to assess the topology, direction and strength of trophic interactions following major invasions and establishment of non-native zooplankton in the early 1990s. We simultaneously compared the effects of fish and clam predation, environmental temperature and salinity intrusion using time-series data from >60 monitoring locations spanning more than three decades.

    AB - Pervasive and accelerating changes to ecosystems due to human activities remain major sources of uncertainty in predicting the structure and dynamics of ecological communities. Understanding which biotic interactions within natural multitrophic communities are weakened or augmented by invasions of non-native species in the context of other environmental pressures is needed for effective management. We used multivariate autoregressive models with detailed time-series data from largely freshwater and brackish regions of the upper San Francisco Estuary to assess the topology, direction and strength of trophic interactions following major invasions and establishment of non-native zooplankton in the early 1990s. We simultaneously compared the effects of fish and clam predation, environmental temperature and salinity intrusion using time-series data from >60 monitoring locations spanning more than three decades.

    KW - Bayesian estimation:

    KW - conservation of interactions

    KW - environmental pressures

    KW - estuaries

    KW - multivariate autoregressive model

    KW - pelagic food webs

    KW - time series.

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