“I don’t have time”: an exploration of the role of time pressures in acceptance of internet interventions for mental health

Janie Busby Grant, Amelia Gulliver, Alison L. Calear, Louise M. Farrer, Phillip J. Batterham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
31 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: internet interventions for common mental disorders are widely available, effective, and economical, yet community uptake remains low. One consistently cited reason for not engaging in mental health interventions is lack of time.
Aims: this research examined whether lack of time as a rationale for not using online interventions reflects real time scarcity, and whether time availability impacts intention to use interventions. Methods: a nationally representative sample (N = 1094, 51% women) reported their time use in activity categories for a typical week. Participants rated their acceptance and likelihood of use of mental health internet interventions, and completed mental health symptom, help-seeking and stigma measures.
Results: amount of leisure time reported by participants was not associated with acceptance or likelihood of use of internet interventions for mental health. however, respondents who worked longer hours ranked time and effort factors as more influential in their intention to use internet-based mental health programs. Younger respondents and those with greater help-seeking attitudes reported higher acceptance of use.
Conclusion: these findings suggest lack of time is not a direct barrier to use of internet interventions, and that perceived time scarcity may be masking real barriers to uptake.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Mental Health
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 May 2023

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of '“I don’t have time”: an exploration of the role of time pressures in acceptance of internet interventions for mental health'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this