“I don't think we've quite got there yet”

The experience of allyship for mental health consumer researchers

Brenda Happell, Brett Scholz, Sarah Gordon, Julia Bocking, Pete Ellis, Cath Roper, Jackie Liggins, Chris Platania-Phung

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction: Australia and New Zealand mental health policy requires consumer participation in all aspects of mental health services. Systemic participation informs and improves the quality of mental health services. Collaboration with consumer researchers should be similarly required. Enhanced understandings of collaborations are needed. Aim: To enhance understanding of the perspectives and experiences of nonconsumer researchers in working collaboratively with consumers as researchers. Method: This qualitative exploratory study involved interviews with nonconsumer mental health researchers who have worked collaboratively with consumers in research. Interviews were conducted with participants from Australia and New Zealand. Results: “Allyship” emerged as a major theme. This describes nonconsumer researchers playing an actively supportive role to facilitate opportunities for the development and growth of consumer research roles and activities. Seven subthemes were identified: establishing and supporting roles, corralling resources, guiding navigation of university systems, advocacy at multiple levels, aspiring to coproduction and consumer-led research, extending connections and partnerships, and desire to do better. Discussion: Allyship may have an important role to play in the broader consumer research agenda and requires further consideration. Implications for practice: Embedding meaningful consumer participation within mental health services requires active consumer involvement in research. Allies can play an important facilitative role.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)453-462
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing
Volume25
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

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Mental Health
Research Personnel
Mental Health Services
Research
New Zealand
Interviews
Health Policy
Growth and Development
Community Participation

Cite this

Happell, Brenda ; Scholz, Brett ; Gordon, Sarah ; Bocking, Julia ; Ellis, Pete ; Roper, Cath ; Liggins, Jackie ; Platania-Phung, Chris. / “I don't think we've quite got there yet” : The experience of allyship for mental health consumer researchers. In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing. 2018 ; Vol. 25, No. 8. pp. 453-462.
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Happell, B, Scholz, B, Gordon, S, Bocking, J, Ellis, P, Roper, C, Liggins, J & Platania-Phung, C 2018, '“I don't think we've quite got there yet”: The experience of allyship for mental health consumer researchers', Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, vol. 25, no. 8, pp. 453-462. https://doi.org/10.1111/jpm.12476

“I don't think we've quite got there yet” : The experience of allyship for mental health consumer researchers. / Happell, Brenda; Scholz, Brett; Gordon, Sarah; Bocking, Julia; Ellis, Pete; Roper, Cath; Liggins, Jackie; Platania-Phung, Chris.

In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, Vol. 25, No. 8, 2018, p. 453-462.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Liggins, Jackie

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