‘I felt like I could do anything!’ Writing the phenomenon of ‘transcendent birth’ through autoethnography

Ella Kurz, D. Davis, J. Browne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To discuss the concept of ‘transcendent birth’, an as yet poorly articulated and under recognised psychosocial wellness phenomenon of childbirth. Design: an auto-ethnographical examination of the primary authors’ journaled experiences as a student midwife and childbearing woman. Setting: three maternity care units in South Eastern Australia as well as the home of the primary author. Findings: The phenomenon of transcendent birth is linked with physiologic birth. Maternity care can hinder or facilitate physiologic birth, and therefore transcendent birth. Key conclusions: Transcendent birth is more likely in maternity care models which value the childbearing woman and physiologic birth. Implications for practice: Women's access to transcendent birth is demarcated by women's position in society, cultural knowledge of transcendent birth and the valuing of transcendent birth as a maternity care outcome.

LanguageEnglish
Pages23-29
Number of pages7
JournalMidwifery
Volume68
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

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Parturition
South Australia
Midwifery
Students

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‘I felt like I could do anything!’ Writing the phenomenon of ‘transcendent birth’ through autoethnography. / Kurz, Ella; Davis, D.; Browne, J.

In: Midwifery, Vol. 68, 01.01.2019, p. 23-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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