Identifying experiences of supportive care of children and young people affected by kidney failure: A qualitative systematic review

C. Paterson, M. Turner, M. E. Hooper, E. Ladbrook, L. Macauley, A. McKie

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Abstract

Background: Children and young people affected by kidney failure experience complexities in their care. Little is known about the unique needs of this young patient population group living with a long-term condition. Objective: A meta-aggregation of all qualitative studies was conducted to identify experiences of supportive care among children and young people living with kidney failure. Methods: A systematic review of qualitative studies was conducted following the Joanna Briggs Institute meta-aggregation method. This review has been reported according to the PRISMA statement guidelines. Six electronic databases (CINAHL, Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Proquest, PsycINFO, and Scopus) were comprehensively searched by an expert systematic review librarian using keywords and subject headings, from inception to September 2022. All studies were accessed using a predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Methodological quality assessment and data extraction performed. Qualitative findings accompanied by illustrative quotes from included studies were extracted and grouped into categories which created the overall synthesised findings. Results: A total of 34 studies were included in this review representing a total of 613 children and young people affected by kidney failure. There was a total of 190 findings which created 13 categories representing experiences of supportive care. The meta-aggregation developed five synthesised findings namely: ‘physical needs’, ‘information and technology’, ‘treatment and healthcare’, ‘social needs’ and ‘psychological impacts’. Conclusion: This systematic review identified that children and young people affected by kidney failure can experience a range of unmet supportive care needs in routine clinical services. Kidney failure impacted children and young people's self-identify, social and peer networks, introduced daily practical needs because of inherent physical and psychological burden due to the failure and associated treatments. Despite improvements in the medical management of kidney failure in children and young people, further attention is needed to optimise supported self-management in this young patient group.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-23
Number of pages23
JournalJournal of Renal Care
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 20 Dec 2023

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