Imaging focal and interstitial fibrosis with cardiovascular magnetic resonance in athletes with left ventricular hypertrophy

Implications for sporting participation

Deirdre F. Waterhouse, Tevfik F. Ismail, Sanjay K. Prasad, Mathew G. Wilson, Rory O'Hanlon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long-term high-intensity physical activity is associated with morphological changes, termed as the 'athlete's heart'. The differentiation of physiological cardiac adaptive changes in response to high-level exercise from pathological changes consistent with an inherited cardiomyopathy is imperative. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging allows definition of abnormal processes occurring at the tissue level, including, importantly, myocardial fibrosis. It is therefore vital in accurately making this differentiation. In this review, we will review the role of CMR imaging of fibrosis, and detail CMR characterisation of myocardial fibrosis in various cardiomyopathies, and the implications of fibrosis. Additionally, we will outline advances in imaging fibrosis, in particular T1 mapping. Finally we will address the role of CMR in pre-participation screening.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)69-75
Number of pages10
JournalBritish Journal of Sports Medicine
Volume46
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Left Ventricular Hypertrophy
Athletes
Fibrosis
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Cardiomyopathies
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Exercise

Cite this

Waterhouse, Deirdre F. ; Ismail, Tevfik F. ; Prasad, Sanjay K. ; Wilson, Mathew G. ; O'Hanlon, Rory. / Imaging focal and interstitial fibrosis with cardiovascular magnetic resonance in athletes with left ventricular hypertrophy : Implications for sporting participation. In: British Journal of Sports Medicine. 2012 ; Vol. 46, No. SUPPL. 1. pp. 69-75.
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Imaging focal and interstitial fibrosis with cardiovascular magnetic resonance in athletes with left ventricular hypertrophy : Implications for sporting participation. / Waterhouse, Deirdre F.; Ismail, Tevfik F.; Prasad, Sanjay K.; Wilson, Mathew G.; O'Hanlon, Rory.

In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, Vol. 46, No. SUPPL. 1, 11.2012, p. 69-75.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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