Impetigo Animal Models: A Review of Their Feasibility and Clinical Utility for Therapeutic Appraisal of Investigational Drug Candidates

Solomon Abrha, Andrew Bartholomaeus, Wubshet Tesfaye, Jackson Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Impetigo (school sores), a superficial skin infection commonly seen in children, is caused by the gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and/or Streptococcus pyogenes. Antibiotic treatments, often topical, are used as the first-line therapy for impetigo. The efficacy of potential new antimicrobial compounds is first tested in in vitro studies and, if effective, followed by in vivo studies using animal models and/or humans. Animal models are critical means for investigating potential therapeutics and characterizing their safety profile prior to human trials. Although several reviews of animal models for skin infections have been published, there is a lack of a comprehensive review of animal models simulating impetigo for the selection of therapeutic drug candidates. This review critically examines the existing animal models for impetigo and their feasibility for testing the in vivo efficacy of topical treatments for impetigo and other superficial bacterial skin infections.
Original languageEnglish
Article number694
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournalAntibiotics
Volume9
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Oct 2020

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Impetigo Animal Models: A Review of Their Feasibility and Clinical Utility for Therapeutic Appraisal of Investigational Drug Candidates'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this