Implementing a Mediterranean diet intervention into a RCT

Lessons learned from a non-Mediterranean based country

G Middleton, Richard KEEGAN, Mark Smith, A Alkhatib, M Klonizakis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    17 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objectives: To examine the participant experiences regarding perceived barriers and facilitators which impact on consuming the Mediterranean diet in the East of England. Design: Qualitative methodology with focus groups. Setting: A healthy, middle-aged population situated in the East of England. Intervention: An 8-week Mediterranean dietary intervention trial. Participants: Eleven participants (including three co-habiting partners) in three focus groups, ranging between 50-65yrs with a mean age of 54.3yrs (±4.0) Results: Thematic analysis from the focus groups revealed that participants considered that the MD intervention had introduced a better quality of food, widening the food-horizon and allowed them to re-define cultural eating habits. They also reported several physical benefits from adapting to this diet and found the experience as positive. Whilst claiming that the MD was an enjoyable and pleasurable, the participants did express difficulty adapting to the eating pattern, finding difficulty in purchasing food items, an increase in food costs and found work, stress and time pressures undermining adherence. Conclusion: The participants’ experiences suggested that the MD was an encouraging dietary change with a middle aged non-Mediterranean based population group. Future MD interventions should tailor interventions and support participants closely, particularly with the necessary planning, organisation and purchasing involved with implementing this diet in non-Mediterranean countries. Secondly, researchers should also challenge any erroneous assumptions regarding the consumption of Mediterranean food, which may hinder implementation.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1019-1022
    Number of pages4
    JournalJournal of Nutrition, Health and Aging
    Volume19
    Issue number10
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2015

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    Mediterranean Diet
    Focus Groups
    Food
    England
    Diet
    Food Quality
    Feeding Behavior
    Population Groups
    Eating
    Research Personnel
    Organizations
    Costs and Cost Analysis
    Population

    Cite this

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    abstract = "Objectives: To examine the participant experiences regarding perceived barriers and facilitators which impact on consuming the Mediterranean diet in the East of England. Design: Qualitative methodology with focus groups. Setting: A healthy, middle-aged population situated in the East of England. Intervention: An 8-week Mediterranean dietary intervention trial. Participants: Eleven participants (including three co-habiting partners) in three focus groups, ranging between 50-65yrs with a mean age of 54.3yrs (±4.0) Results: Thematic analysis from the focus groups revealed that participants considered that the MD intervention had introduced a better quality of food, widening the food-horizon and allowed them to re-define cultural eating habits. They also reported several physical benefits from adapting to this diet and found the experience as positive. Whilst claiming that the MD was an enjoyable and pleasurable, the participants did express difficulty adapting to the eating pattern, finding difficulty in purchasing food items, an increase in food costs and found work, stress and time pressures undermining adherence. Conclusion: The participants’ experiences suggested that the MD was an encouraging dietary change with a middle aged non-Mediterranean based population group. Future MD interventions should tailor interventions and support participants closely, particularly with the necessary planning, organisation and purchasing involved with implementing this diet in non-Mediterranean countries. Secondly, researchers should also challenge any erroneous assumptions regarding the consumption of Mediterranean food, which may hinder implementation.",
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    Implementing a Mediterranean diet intervention into a RCT : Lessons learned from a non-Mediterranean based country. / Middleton, G; KEEGAN, Richard; Smith, Mark; Alkhatib, A; Klonizakis, M.

    In: Journal of Nutrition, Health and Aging, Vol. 19, No. 10, 01.12.2015, p. 1019-1022.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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