Implications of structure versus agency for addressing health and well-being in our ecologically constrained world: With a focus on prospects for gender equity

Helen Walls, Colin BUTLER, Jane Dixon, Indira Samarawickrema

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Abstract

The long-standing debate in public health and the wider society concerning the implications of structure and agency for health and well-being generally concludes that structure powerfully influences agency, and does so unequally, exacerbating social and health inequities. In this article, we review this debate in the context of increasing environmental degradation and resource depletion. As the global population rises and environmental resources per person shrink, conflicts over the underlying factors contributing to human health and well-being may intensify. A likely result of nearing limits is a further constraint of agency, for both rich and poor, and greater social and health inequities, including gender inequities.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-69
Number of pages23
JournalInternational Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2015

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well-being
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environmental damage
resources
Public Health
public health
human being
Well-being
Gender Equity
Population
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