Improving pronunciation

Using guided reflective journals

Emmaline Lear

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

Abstract

Improving pronunciation, in the first instance, needs to be promoted in the classroom where teachers can initiate opportunities for good practice. The use of guided reflective journals is one intervention strategy that may allow both learners and teachers to better position themselves within the context of learning and teaching intelligible pronunciation. This study explores the effectiveness of guided reflective journals to improve intelligibility in a Japanese
higher educational context. Based on qualitative and quantitative methods, the paper evaluates changes in speech over the duration of one semester. In particular, students from an experimental group were asked to record their voice at the beginning and at the end of the semester as part of guided reflective journals 1 and 4. Students from a control group were also asked to record their voice. Three native and non-native speaker raters focused on changes in
prosodic features, such as stress, intonation and pausing. Segmental features were also considered. Results from this study show that the reflective journals served to direct autonomous learning efforts and motivated the participants from the experimental group to improve more than the control group, especially with regard to word stress, intonation and pausing. While this paper aims to address gaps in the literature and promote the teaching and learning of pronunciation in the classroom, further research is needed to explore the use and benefits of guided reflective journals as an independent learning tool to improve pronunciation.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPractices and Policies: Current Research in Languages and Cultures Education
Subtitle of host publicationSelected Proceedings of the Second National LCNAU Colloquium, Canberra, 3-5 July 2013
EditorsCatherine Travis, John Hajek, Colin Nettelbeck, Elizabeth Beckmann, Anya Lloyd-Smith
Place of PublicationMelbourne, Australia
PublisherLCNAU
Pages377-393
Number of pages17
ISBN (Print)9781921944918
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventSecond National LCNAU Colloquium - Canberra, Australia
Duration: 3 Jul 20135 Jul 2013

Conference

ConferenceSecond National LCNAU Colloquium
CountryAustralia
CityCanberra
Period3/07/135/07/13

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Cite this

Lear, E. (2014). Improving pronunciation: Using guided reflective journals. In C. Travis, J. Hajek, C. Nettelbeck, E. Beckmann, & A. Lloyd-Smith (Eds.), Practices and Policies: Current Research in Languages and Cultures Education: Selected Proceedings of the Second National LCNAU Colloquium, Canberra, 3-5 July 2013 (pp. 377-393). Melbourne, Australia: LCNAU.
Lear, Emmaline. / Improving pronunciation : Using guided reflective journals. Practices and Policies: Current Research in Languages and Cultures Education: Selected Proceedings of the Second National LCNAU Colloquium, Canberra, 3-5 July 2013. editor / Catherine Travis ; John Hajek ; Colin Nettelbeck ; Elizabeth Beckmann ; Anya Lloyd-Smith. Melbourne, Australia : LCNAU, 2014. pp. 377-393
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title = "Improving pronunciation: Using guided reflective journals",
abstract = "Improving pronunciation, in the first instance, needs to be promoted in the classroom where teachers can initiate opportunities for good practice. The use of guided reflective journals is one intervention strategy that may allow both learners and teachers to better position themselves within the context of learning and teaching intelligible pronunciation. This study explores the effectiveness of guided reflective journals to improve intelligibility in a Japanesehigher educational context. Based on qualitative and quantitative methods, the paper evaluates changes in speech over the duration of one semester. In particular, students from an experimental group were asked to record their voice at the beginning and at the end of the semester as part of guided reflective journals 1 and 4. Students from a control group were also asked to record their voice. Three native and non-native speaker raters focused on changes inprosodic features, such as stress, intonation and pausing. Segmental features were also considered. Results from this study show that the reflective journals served to direct autonomous learning efforts and motivated the participants from the experimental group to improve more than the control group, especially with regard to word stress, intonation and pausing. While this paper aims to address gaps in the literature and promote the teaching and learning of pronunciation in the classroom, further research is needed to explore the use and benefits of guided reflective journals as an independent learning tool to improve pronunciation.",
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Lear, E 2014, Improving pronunciation: Using guided reflective journals. in C Travis, J Hajek, C Nettelbeck, E Beckmann & A Lloyd-Smith (eds), Practices and Policies: Current Research in Languages and Cultures Education: Selected Proceedings of the Second National LCNAU Colloquium, Canberra, 3-5 July 2013. LCNAU, Melbourne, Australia, pp. 377-393, Second National LCNAU Colloquium, Canberra, Australia, 3/07/13.

Improving pronunciation : Using guided reflective journals. / Lear, Emmaline.

Practices and Policies: Current Research in Languages and Cultures Education: Selected Proceedings of the Second National LCNAU Colloquium, Canberra, 3-5 July 2013. ed. / Catherine Travis; John Hajek; Colin Nettelbeck; Elizabeth Beckmann; Anya Lloyd-Smith. Melbourne, Australia : LCNAU, 2014. p. 377-393.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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AB - Improving pronunciation, in the first instance, needs to be promoted in the classroom where teachers can initiate opportunities for good practice. The use of guided reflective journals is one intervention strategy that may allow both learners and teachers to better position themselves within the context of learning and teaching intelligible pronunciation. This study explores the effectiveness of guided reflective journals to improve intelligibility in a Japanesehigher educational context. Based on qualitative and quantitative methods, the paper evaluates changes in speech over the duration of one semester. In particular, students from an experimental group were asked to record their voice at the beginning and at the end of the semester as part of guided reflective journals 1 and 4. Students from a control group were also asked to record their voice. Three native and non-native speaker raters focused on changes inprosodic features, such as stress, intonation and pausing. Segmental features were also considered. Results from this study show that the reflective journals served to direct autonomous learning efforts and motivated the participants from the experimental group to improve more than the control group, especially with regard to word stress, intonation and pausing. While this paper aims to address gaps in the literature and promote the teaching and learning of pronunciation in the classroom, further research is needed to explore the use and benefits of guided reflective journals as an independent learning tool to improve pronunciation.

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Lear E. Improving pronunciation: Using guided reflective journals. In Travis C, Hajek J, Nettelbeck C, Beckmann E, Lloyd-Smith A, editors, Practices and Policies: Current Research in Languages and Cultures Education: Selected Proceedings of the Second National LCNAU Colloquium, Canberra, 3-5 July 2013. Melbourne, Australia: LCNAU. 2014. p. 377-393