In power but not in office: How radical right 'outsiders' can influence their mainstream rivals - the UK and Australian cases

Alan Wager, Tim Bale, Anika Gauja, Jordan McSwiney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

Countries with populist radical right governments are the exception rather than the rule. This paper uses the Australian case of Pauline Hanson’s One Nation (PHON) and the UK case of the UK Independence Party (UKIP) – and its effective successor, the Brexit Party – to help explain a puzzle: how do populist radical right parties in the absence of any likely route to winning office or even holding legislative influence achieve policy payoffs? Tracing the political factors that have driven policy influence in these two cases reveals that an entrepreneurial leader with agenda-setting influence can have policy impact, despite disadvantageous structural conditions, through the following: leveraging electoral influence over both social democratic and mainstream right parties; gaining credibility through sub-national elections; and achieving (or threatening to achieve) defections from centre-right parties.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)125-145
Number of pages21
JournalCommonwealth and Comparative Politics
Volume60
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Apr 2022
Externally publishedYes

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