Inadequate Evaluation and Management of Threats in Australia's Marine Parks, Including the Great Barrier Reef, Misdirect Marine Conservation

Robert Kearney, G. Farebrother

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The magnificence of the Great Barrier Reef and its worthiness of extraordinary efforts to protect it from whatever threats may arise are unquestioned. Yet almost four decades after the establishment of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, Australia's most expensive and intensely researched Marine Protected Area, the health of the Reef is reported to be declining alarmingly. The management of the suite of threats to the health of the reef has clearly been inadequate, even though there have been several notable successes. It is argued that the failure to prioritise correctly all major threats to the reef, coupled with the exaggeration of the benefits of calling the park a protected area and zoning subsets of areas as ‘no-take’, has distracted attention from adequately addressing the real causes of impact. Australia's marine conservation efforts have been dominated by commitment to a National Representative System of Marine Protected Areas. In so doing, Australia has displaced the internationally accepted primary priority for pursuing effective protection of marine environments with inadequately critical adherence to the principle of having more and bigger marine parks. The continuing decline in the health of the Great Barrier Reef and other Australian coastal areas confirms the limitations of current area management for combating threats to marine ecosystems. There is great need for more critical evaluation of how marine environments can be protected effectively and managed efficiently.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAdvances in Marine Biology
EditorsM.L Johnson, J Sandell
Place of PublicationLondon, UK
PublisherElsevier
Chapter7
Pages253-288
Number of pages36
Volume69
ISBN (Print)9780128002148
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Publication series

NameAdvances in Marine Biology
PublisherElsevier
Volume69
ISSN (Print)0065-2881

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marine park
barrier reef
protected area
reef
marine environment
marine ecosystem
zoning
health
evaluation

Cite this

Kearney, R., & Farebrother, G. (2014). Inadequate Evaluation and Management of Threats in Australia's Marine Parks, Including the Great Barrier Reef, Misdirect Marine Conservation. In M. L. Johnson, & J. Sandell (Eds.), Advances in Marine Biology (Vol. 69, pp. 253-288). (Advances in Marine Biology; Vol. 69). London, UK: Elsevier. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800214-8.00007-4
Kearney, Robert ; Farebrother, G. / Inadequate Evaluation and Management of Threats in Australia's Marine Parks, Including the Great Barrier Reef, Misdirect Marine Conservation. Advances in Marine Biology. editor / M.L Johnson ; J Sandell. Vol. 69 London, UK : Elsevier, 2014. pp. 253-288 (Advances in Marine Biology).
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abstract = "The magnificence of the Great Barrier Reef and its worthiness of extraordinary efforts to protect it from whatever threats may arise are unquestioned. Yet almost four decades after the establishment of the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park, Australia's most expensive and intensely researched Marine Protected Area, the health of the Reef is reported to be declining alarmingly. The management of the suite of threats to the health of the reef has clearly been inadequate, even though there have been several notable successes. It is argued that the failure to prioritise correctly all major threats to the reef, coupled with the exaggeration of the benefits of calling the park a protected area and zoning subsets of areas as ‘no-take’, has distracted attention from adequately addressing the real causes of impact. Australia's marine conservation efforts have been dominated by commitment to a National Representative System of Marine Protected Areas. In so doing, Australia has displaced the internationally accepted primary priority for pursuing effective protection of marine environments with inadequately critical adherence to the principle of having more and bigger marine parks. The continuing decline in the health of the Great Barrier Reef and other Australian coastal areas confirms the limitations of current area management for combating threats to marine ecosystems. There is great need for more critical evaluation of how marine environments can be protected effectively and managed efficiently.",
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Kearney, R & Farebrother, G 2014, Inadequate Evaluation and Management of Threats in Australia's Marine Parks, Including the Great Barrier Reef, Misdirect Marine Conservation. in ML Johnson & J Sandell (eds), Advances in Marine Biology. vol. 69, Advances in Marine Biology, vol. 69, Elsevier, London, UK, pp. 253-288. https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800214-8.00007-4

Inadequate Evaluation and Management of Threats in Australia's Marine Parks, Including the Great Barrier Reef, Misdirect Marine Conservation. / Kearney, Robert; Farebrother, G.

Advances in Marine Biology. ed. / M.L Johnson; J Sandell. Vol. 69 London, UK : Elsevier, 2014. p. 253-288 (Advances in Marine Biology; Vol. 69).

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookChapter

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Kearney R, Farebrother G. Inadequate Evaluation and Management of Threats in Australia's Marine Parks, Including the Great Barrier Reef, Misdirect Marine Conservation. In Johnson ML, Sandell J, editors, Advances in Marine Biology. Vol. 69. London, UK: Elsevier. 2014. p. 253-288. (Advances in Marine Biology). https://doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-12-800214-8.00007-4