Increased delivery stride length places greater loads on the ankle joint in elite male cricket fast bowlers

Wayne SPRATFORD, Amy Hicks

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect stride length has on ankle biomechanics of the leading leg with reference to the potential risk of injury in cricket fast bowlers. Ankle joint kinematic and kinetic data were collected from 51 male fast bowlers during the stance phase of the final delivery stride. The bowling cohort comprised national under-19, first class and international-level athletes. Bowlers were placed into either Short, Average or Long groups based on final stride length, allowing statistical differences to be measured. A multivariate analysis of variance with a Bonferroni post-hoc correction (α = 0.05) revealed significant differences between peak plantarflexion angles (Short-Long P = 0.005, Average and Long P = 0.04) and negative joint work (Average-Long P = 0.026). This study highlighted that during fast bowling the ankle joint of the leading leg experiences high forces under wide ranges of movement. As stride length increases, greater amounts of negative work and plantarflexion are experienced. These increases place greater loads on the ankle joint and move the foot into positions that make it more susceptible to injuries such as posterior impingement syndrome.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1101-1109
    Number of pages9
    JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
    Volume32
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jul 2014

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Increased delivery stride length places greater loads on the ankle joint in elite male cricket fast bowlers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this