Indigenous graduate research students in Australia

a critical review of the research

Nikki Moodie, Shaun Ewen, Julie McLeod, Chris Platania-Phung

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the last decade, there has been a steady increase in the number of Indigenous graduate research students in Australia, yet research and pedagogy has not kept pace with changes underway in the sector. From an extensive search of literature published between 2000 and 2017, 15 papers (representing 10 research projects conducted by seven teams or authors) were identified that addressed Indigenous graduate research student experience. Overall, the literature tends to focus on identifying barriers to completion, noting in particular the impact of financial difficulties, social isolation and racism. A research degree is a key site for the assertion and legitimation of Indigenous knowledges, and it is here that Indigenous students are navigating tensions between legitimated disciplinary practices of the centre and the peripheral status of Indigenous knowledges. We, therefore, adopt Herbert's ‘centre–periphery’ model to interpret the research, arguing that this framework explains the focus on barriers, the neglect of pedagogy centred on academic excellence and student strengths, and research relationships between students and Indigenous communities. Our review identifies the need for a systematic research agenda specifically focused on Indigenous student success at the graduate research level, and looking internationally in order to assess the performance and strategies of Australian higher education providers in comparison to international institutions meeting the aims of First Nations research communities. This approach, we suggest, should move beyond an analysis of the nature of enablers and barriers to focus on Indigenous Higher Degree by Research success.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)805-820
Number of pages16
JournalHigher Education Research and Development
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Jun 2018
Externally publishedYes

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graduate
student
legitimation
knowledge
racism
community
neglect
social isolation
research project
performance
education
experience

Cite this

Moodie, Nikki ; Ewen, Shaun ; McLeod, Julie ; Platania-Phung, Chris. / Indigenous graduate research students in Australia : a critical review of the research. In: Higher Education Research and Development. 2018 ; Vol. 37, No. 4. pp. 805-820.
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Indigenous graduate research students in Australia : a critical review of the research. / Moodie, Nikki; Ewen, Shaun; McLeod, Julie; Platania-Phung, Chris.

In: Higher Education Research and Development, Vol. 37, No. 4, 07.06.2018, p. 805-820.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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T2 - a critical review of the research

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AU - McLeod, Julie

AU - Platania-Phung, Chris

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