Influence of dynamic versus static core exercises on performance in field based fitness tests

Kelly Parkhouse, Nick Ball

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Minimal evidence supports the claim that core stability training transfers into improved performance and the most effective training method to perform core exercises is still unknown. The purpose of the study was to compare the effects of a 6 week unstable static versus unstable dynamic core training program, on field based fitness tests. A static (n = 6) and dynamic (n = 6) training group performed two 45 min sessions per week for six weeks. Seven performance tests, consisting of three core (plank; double leg lowering; back extensions), one static (standing stork) and three dynamic (overhead medicine ball throw; vertical jump; 20 m sprint), were administered pre- and post training. Between group differences were assessed using a repeated measures MANOVA (P < 0.05). Both training groups improved in each of the core tests (P < 0.05). Neither training group demonstrated improvement in the dynamic field based tests (medicine ball throw, vertical jump height and 20 m sprint) (P > 0.05). Findings indicate that both types of training improved specific measures of core stability but did not transfer into any sport-related skill.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)517-524
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Sports
Leg
Medicine
Education
Transfer (Psychology)

Cite this

@article{7418dc86e6684b259575ed3c79384ee3,
title = "Influence of dynamic versus static core exercises on performance in field based fitness tests",
abstract = "Minimal evidence supports the claim that core stability training transfers into improved performance and the most effective training method to perform core exercises is still unknown. The purpose of the study was to compare the effects of a 6 week unstable static versus unstable dynamic core training program, on field based fitness tests. A static (n = 6) and dynamic (n = 6) training group performed two 45 min sessions per week for six weeks. Seven performance tests, consisting of three core (plank; double leg lowering; back extensions), one static (standing stork) and three dynamic (overhead medicine ball throw; vertical jump; 20 m sprint), were administered pre- and post training. Between group differences were assessed using a repeated measures MANOVA (P < 0.05). Both training groups improved in each of the core tests (P < 0.05). Neither training group demonstrated improvement in the dynamic field based tests (medicine ball throw, vertical jump height and 20 m sprint) (P > 0.05). Findings indicate that both types of training improved specific measures of core stability but did not transfer into any sport-related skill.",
keywords = "Performanc, Stability ball",
author = "Kelly Parkhouse and Nick Ball",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1016/J.JBMT.2010.12.001",
language = "English",
volume = "15",
pages = "517--524",
journal = "Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies",
issn = "1360-8592",
publisher = "Churchill Livingstone",
number = "4",

}

Influence of dynamic versus static core exercises on performance in field based fitness tests. / Parkhouse, Kelly; Ball, Nick.

In: Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies, Vol. 15, No. 4, 2011, p. 517-524.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of dynamic versus static core exercises on performance in field based fitness tests

AU - Parkhouse, Kelly

AU - Ball, Nick

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Minimal evidence supports the claim that core stability training transfers into improved performance and the most effective training method to perform core exercises is still unknown. The purpose of the study was to compare the effects of a 6 week unstable static versus unstable dynamic core training program, on field based fitness tests. A static (n = 6) and dynamic (n = 6) training group performed two 45 min sessions per week for six weeks. Seven performance tests, consisting of three core (plank; double leg lowering; back extensions), one static (standing stork) and three dynamic (overhead medicine ball throw; vertical jump; 20 m sprint), were administered pre- and post training. Between group differences were assessed using a repeated measures MANOVA (P < 0.05). Both training groups improved in each of the core tests (P < 0.05). Neither training group demonstrated improvement in the dynamic field based tests (medicine ball throw, vertical jump height and 20 m sprint) (P > 0.05). Findings indicate that both types of training improved specific measures of core stability but did not transfer into any sport-related skill.

AB - Minimal evidence supports the claim that core stability training transfers into improved performance and the most effective training method to perform core exercises is still unknown. The purpose of the study was to compare the effects of a 6 week unstable static versus unstable dynamic core training program, on field based fitness tests. A static (n = 6) and dynamic (n = 6) training group performed two 45 min sessions per week for six weeks. Seven performance tests, consisting of three core (plank; double leg lowering; back extensions), one static (standing stork) and three dynamic (overhead medicine ball throw; vertical jump; 20 m sprint), were administered pre- and post training. Between group differences were assessed using a repeated measures MANOVA (P < 0.05). Both training groups improved in each of the core tests (P < 0.05). Neither training group demonstrated improvement in the dynamic field based tests (medicine ball throw, vertical jump height and 20 m sprint) (P > 0.05). Findings indicate that both types of training improved specific measures of core stability but did not transfer into any sport-related skill.

KW - Performanc

KW - Stability ball

U2 - 10.1016/J.JBMT.2010.12.001

DO - 10.1016/J.JBMT.2010.12.001

M3 - Article

VL - 15

SP - 517

EP - 524

JO - Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies

JF - Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies

SN - 1360-8592

IS - 4

ER -