Influence of post-warm-up recovery time on swim performance in international swimmers

D.J. West, B.M. Dietzig, R.M. Bracken, D.J. Cunningham, Blair T Crewther, C.J. Cook, Liam P Kilduff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objectives: Swimmers must enter a marshalling call-room 20. min prior to racing, which results in some swimmers completing their warm-up 45. min pre-race. Since a recovery period longer than 15-20. min may prove problematic, this study examined 200. m freestyle performance after a 20 and 45. min post-warm-up recovery period. Design: Eight international swimmers completed this randomised and counter-balanced study. Methods: After a standardised warm-up, swimmers rested for either 20 (20min) or 45min (45min) prior to completing a 200m freestyle time-trial (TT). Core temperature (Tcore), blood lactate (BL), heart rate and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded at baseline, post-warm-up, pre-TT, immediately post-TT and at 3min post-TT. Results: Tcore was similar after the warm-up under both conditions, however, at pre-TT Tcore was greater under 20min (mean±SD; 20min 37.8±0.2 vs. 45min 37.5±0.2°C; P=0.002). BL was similar between conditions at all-time points before the TT (P>0.05). Swimmers demonstrated a 1.5±1.1% improvement in performance under 20min (20min 125.74±3.64 vs. 45min 127.60±3.55s; P=0.01). Tcore was similar between conditions at immediately post-TT and 3min post-TT (P>0.05), however, BL was higher at these time points under 20min (P<0.05). Heart rate and RPE were similar between conditions at all-time points (P>0.05). Conclusions: 200m freestyle performance is faster 20min post-warm-up when compared to 45min probably due to better Tcore maintenance. This has implications for swim race preparation as warm-up procedures should be completed close to entering the pre-race call room, in order to maintain elevated core temperature
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)172-176
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Lactic Acid
Temperature
Heart Rate
Maintenance
carbosulfan

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West, D. J., Dietzig, B. M., Bracken, R. M., Cunningham, D. J., Crewther, B. T., Cook, C. J., & Kilduff, L. P. (2013). Influence of post-warm-up recovery time on swim performance in international swimmers. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 16(2), 172-176. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2012.06.002
West, D.J. ; Dietzig, B.M. ; Bracken, R.M. ; Cunningham, D.J. ; Crewther, Blair T ; Cook, C.J. ; Kilduff, Liam P. / Influence of post-warm-up recovery time on swim performance in international swimmers. In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. 2013 ; Vol. 16, No. 2. pp. 172-176.
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West, DJ, Dietzig, BM, Bracken, RM, Cunningham, DJ, Crewther, BT, Cook, CJ & Kilduff, LP 2013, 'Influence of post-warm-up recovery time on swim performance in international swimmers', Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, vol. 16, no. 2, pp. 172-176. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2012.06.002

Influence of post-warm-up recovery time on swim performance in international swimmers. / West, D.J.; Dietzig, B.M.; Bracken, R.M.; Cunningham, D.J.; Crewther, Blair T; Cook, C.J.; Kilduff, Liam P.

In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Vol. 16, No. 2, 2013, p. 172-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of post-warm-up recovery time on swim performance in international swimmers

AU - West, D.J.

AU - Dietzig, B.M.

AU - Bracken, R.M.

AU - Cunningham, D.J.

AU - Crewther, Blair T

AU - Cook, C.J.

AU - Kilduff, Liam P

N1 - Cited By :16 Export Date: 25 May 2017

PY - 2013

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N2 - Objectives: Swimmers must enter a marshalling call-room 20. min prior to racing, which results in some swimmers completing their warm-up 45. min pre-race. Since a recovery period longer than 15-20. min may prove problematic, this study examined 200. m freestyle performance after a 20 and 45. min post-warm-up recovery period. Design: Eight international swimmers completed this randomised and counter-balanced study. Methods: After a standardised warm-up, swimmers rested for either 20 (20min) or 45min (45min) prior to completing a 200m freestyle time-trial (TT). Core temperature (Tcore), blood lactate (BL), heart rate and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded at baseline, post-warm-up, pre-TT, immediately post-TT and at 3min post-TT. Results: Tcore was similar after the warm-up under both conditions, however, at pre-TT Tcore was greater under 20min (mean±SD; 20min 37.8±0.2 vs. 45min 37.5±0.2°C; P=0.002). BL was similar between conditions at all-time points before the TT (P>0.05). Swimmers demonstrated a 1.5±1.1% improvement in performance under 20min (20min 125.74±3.64 vs. 45min 127.60±3.55s; P=0.01). Tcore was similar between conditions at immediately post-TT and 3min post-TT (P>0.05), however, BL was higher at these time points under 20min (P<0.05). Heart rate and RPE were similar between conditions at all-time points (P>0.05). Conclusions: 200m freestyle performance is faster 20min post-warm-up when compared to 45min probably due to better Tcore maintenance. This has implications for swim race preparation as warm-up procedures should be completed close to entering the pre-race call room, in order to maintain elevated core temperature

AB - Objectives: Swimmers must enter a marshalling call-room 20. min prior to racing, which results in some swimmers completing their warm-up 45. min pre-race. Since a recovery period longer than 15-20. min may prove problematic, this study examined 200. m freestyle performance after a 20 and 45. min post-warm-up recovery period. Design: Eight international swimmers completed this randomised and counter-balanced study. Methods: After a standardised warm-up, swimmers rested for either 20 (20min) or 45min (45min) prior to completing a 200m freestyle time-trial (TT). Core temperature (Tcore), blood lactate (BL), heart rate and rate of perceived exertion (RPE) were recorded at baseline, post-warm-up, pre-TT, immediately post-TT and at 3min post-TT. Results: Tcore was similar after the warm-up under both conditions, however, at pre-TT Tcore was greater under 20min (mean±SD; 20min 37.8±0.2 vs. 45min 37.5±0.2°C; P=0.002). BL was similar between conditions at all-time points before the TT (P>0.05). Swimmers demonstrated a 1.5±1.1% improvement in performance under 20min (20min 125.74±3.64 vs. 45min 127.60±3.55s; P=0.01). Tcore was similar between conditions at immediately post-TT and 3min post-TT (P>0.05), however, BL was higher at these time points under 20min (P<0.05). Heart rate and RPE were similar between conditions at all-time points (P>0.05). Conclusions: 200m freestyle performance is faster 20min post-warm-up when compared to 45min probably due to better Tcore maintenance. This has implications for swim race preparation as warm-up procedures should be completed close to entering the pre-race call room, in order to maintain elevated core temperature

KW - Core temperature

KW - Swim performance

KW - Warm-up

U2 - 10.1016/j.jsams.2012.06.002

DO - 10.1016/j.jsams.2012.06.002

M3 - Article

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JO - Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

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SN - 1440-2440

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