Injury prevention strategies specific to pre-elite athletes competing in Olympic and professional sports

A systematic review

Erin A. Smyth, Phillip Newman, Gordon Waddington, Juanita R. Weissensteiner, Michael K. Drew

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: To describe and evaluate injury prevention interventions for pre-elite athletes who compete in an Olympic or professional sport. Design: Systematic review. Methods: This review was prospectively registered (PROSPERO CRD42017065083) and a systematic electronic search was conducted in May 2017. The following inclusion criteriawere applied:1) Studies including and analysing data specific to pre-elite athletes (determined by the T3/T4 levels of the FTEM model); 2) Featured injury prevention interventions; 3) Provided sufficient data related to injury such that the effect can be analysed e.g. injury rates, incidence, prevalence, injury rate ratios; 4) Featured randomised and non-randomised controlled trials or prospective cohorts. Results: A total of 13,480 articles were retrieved with 118 titles identified and 11 studies satisfying the inclusion criteria. No studies demonstrated a low risk of bias. Four different interventions were identified: exercise (n=7, 64%), psychological (n=2, 18%), equipment (n=1, 9%), nutrition (n=1, 9%). Of the seven exercise interventions, four showed a protective effect and three found no significant effect, providing conflicting evidence. Caution is advised due to high risk of bias,low intervention reporting and minimal evidence for implementation planning in all seven studies. Conclusion: There is limited evidence from level 2 and 3 studies suggesting exercise and psychology interventions may prevent injury in pre-elite athletes. There is an absence of evidence to support the use of equipment and nutrition interventions in pre-elite athletes. There is a need for quality research designs confirming the clinical impact of existing injury prevention interventions for pre-elite athletes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-30
Number of pages30
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2019

Fingerprint

Athletes
Sports
Wounds and Injuries
Exercise
Psychology
Equipment and Supplies
Research Design
Incidence

Cite this

@article{a5000d59c23543c6924c73d9877a9d66,
title = "Injury prevention strategies specific to pre-elite athletes competing in Olympic and professional sports: A systematic review",
abstract = "Objective: To describe and evaluate injury prevention interventions for pre-elite athletes who compete in an Olympic or professional sport. Design: Systematic review. Methods: This review was prospectively registered (PROSPERO CRD42017065083) and a systematic electronic search was conducted in May 2017. The following inclusion criteriawere applied:1) Studies including and analysing data specific to pre-elite athletes (determined by the T3/T4 levels of the FTEM model); 2) Featured injury prevention interventions; 3) Provided sufficient data related to injury such that the effect can be analysed e.g. injury rates, incidence, prevalence, injury rate ratios; 4) Featured randomised and non-randomised controlled trials or prospective cohorts. Results: A total of 13,480 articles were retrieved with 118 titles identified and 11 studies satisfying the inclusion criteria. No studies demonstrated a low risk of bias. Four different interventions were identified: exercise (n=7, 64{\%}), psychological (n=2, 18{\%}), equipment (n=1, 9{\%}), nutrition (n=1, 9{\%}). Of the seven exercise interventions, four showed a protective effect and three found no significant effect, providing conflicting evidence. Caution is advised due to high risk of bias,low intervention reporting and minimal evidence for implementation planning in all seven studies. Conclusion: There is limited evidence from level 2 and 3 studies suggesting exercise and psychology interventions may prevent injury in pre-elite athletes. There is an absence of evidence to support the use of equipment and nutrition interventions in pre-elite athletes. There is a need for quality research designs confirming the clinical impact of existing injury prevention interventions for pre-elite athletes.",
author = "Smyth, {Erin A.} and Phillip Newman and Gordon Waddington and Weissensteiner, {Juanita R.} and Drew, {Michael K.}",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1016/j.jsams.2019.03.002",
language = "English",
pages = "1--30",
journal = "Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport",
issn = "1440-2440",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

Injury prevention strategies specific to pre-elite athletes competing in Olympic and professional sports : A systematic review. / Smyth, Erin A.; Newman, Phillip; Waddington, Gordon; Weissensteiner, Juanita R.; Drew, Michael K.

In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 2019, p. 1-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Injury prevention strategies specific to pre-elite athletes competing in Olympic and professional sports

T2 - A systematic review

AU - Smyth, Erin A.

AU - Newman, Phillip

AU - Waddington, Gordon

AU - Weissensteiner, Juanita R.

AU - Drew, Michael K.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Objective: To describe and evaluate injury prevention interventions for pre-elite athletes who compete in an Olympic or professional sport. Design: Systematic review. Methods: This review was prospectively registered (PROSPERO CRD42017065083) and a systematic electronic search was conducted in May 2017. The following inclusion criteriawere applied:1) Studies including and analysing data specific to pre-elite athletes (determined by the T3/T4 levels of the FTEM model); 2) Featured injury prevention interventions; 3) Provided sufficient data related to injury such that the effect can be analysed e.g. injury rates, incidence, prevalence, injury rate ratios; 4) Featured randomised and non-randomised controlled trials or prospective cohorts. Results: A total of 13,480 articles were retrieved with 118 titles identified and 11 studies satisfying the inclusion criteria. No studies demonstrated a low risk of bias. Four different interventions were identified: exercise (n=7, 64%), psychological (n=2, 18%), equipment (n=1, 9%), nutrition (n=1, 9%). Of the seven exercise interventions, four showed a protective effect and three found no significant effect, providing conflicting evidence. Caution is advised due to high risk of bias,low intervention reporting and minimal evidence for implementation planning in all seven studies. Conclusion: There is limited evidence from level 2 and 3 studies suggesting exercise and psychology interventions may prevent injury in pre-elite athletes. There is an absence of evidence to support the use of equipment and nutrition interventions in pre-elite athletes. There is a need for quality research designs confirming the clinical impact of existing injury prevention interventions for pre-elite athletes.

AB - Objective: To describe and evaluate injury prevention interventions for pre-elite athletes who compete in an Olympic or professional sport. Design: Systematic review. Methods: This review was prospectively registered (PROSPERO CRD42017065083) and a systematic electronic search was conducted in May 2017. The following inclusion criteriawere applied:1) Studies including and analysing data specific to pre-elite athletes (determined by the T3/T4 levels of the FTEM model); 2) Featured injury prevention interventions; 3) Provided sufficient data related to injury such that the effect can be analysed e.g. injury rates, incidence, prevalence, injury rate ratios; 4) Featured randomised and non-randomised controlled trials or prospective cohorts. Results: A total of 13,480 articles were retrieved with 118 titles identified and 11 studies satisfying the inclusion criteria. No studies demonstrated a low risk of bias. Four different interventions were identified: exercise (n=7, 64%), psychological (n=2, 18%), equipment (n=1, 9%), nutrition (n=1, 9%). Of the seven exercise interventions, four showed a protective effect and three found no significant effect, providing conflicting evidence. Caution is advised due to high risk of bias,low intervention reporting and minimal evidence for implementation planning in all seven studies. Conclusion: There is limited evidence from level 2 and 3 studies suggesting exercise and psychology interventions may prevent injury in pre-elite athletes. There is an absence of evidence to support the use of equipment and nutrition interventions in pre-elite athletes. There is a need for quality research designs confirming the clinical impact of existing injury prevention interventions for pre-elite athletes.

UR - https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2019.03.002

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/title-injury-prevention-strategies-specific-preelite-athletes-competing-olympic-professional-sportsa

U2 - 10.1016/j.jsams.2019.03.002

DO - 10.1016/j.jsams.2019.03.002

M3 - Article

SP - 1

EP - 30

JO - Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

JF - Australian Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport

SN - 1440-2440

ER -