Inter-channel Effects in Multichannel Travel Services: Moderating Role of Social Presence and Need for Human Interaction

Marjan Aslanzadeh, Byron KEATING

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Travel agents continue to offer traditional services, but as customers migrate to online sales channels, many traditional agencies have added their own online distribution channels. This study of the attitudes of 114 university students finds that excellence in offline service is associated with a favorable view of an agent’s online presence. Moderating this relationship is the effect of social presence (SP) on the website. That is, the respondents’ view of the website was improved by the availability of live chat or video chat interactions. The effect of SP also interacted with some respondents’ need for human interaction (NHI), although that effect was not strong. The study used a novel comic-strip format to depict the process of purchasing airline tickets and hotel accommodations with three treatments: offline, online with weak SP, and online with strong SP. The study compared the attitudes toward an agency’s online channel based on its in-person service quality, as moderated by the website’s SP and the respondents’ NHI.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)265-276
Number of pages12
JournalCornell Hospitality Quarterly
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

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student
travel
services
need
effect
Interaction
Social presence
Web sites
service quality
distribution
video
Accommodation
Purchasing
Online sales
Hotels
Distribution channels
Airlines
Service quality
Travel agents
Online channel

Cite this

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Inter-channel Effects in Multichannel Travel Services: Moderating Role of Social Presence and Need for Human Interaction. / Aslanzadeh, Marjan; KEATING, Byron.

In: Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, Vol. 55, No. 3, 2014, p. 265-276.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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