Interaction between coastal and oceanic ecosystems of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean through predator-prey relationship studies.

Valerie Allain, Emilie Fernandez, Simon D. Hoyle, Sylvain Caillot, Jesus Jurado-Molina, Serge Andréfouët, Simon J. Nicol

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Western and Central Pacific Ocean sustains the highest tuna production in the world. This province is also characterized by many islands and a complex bathymetry that induces specific current circulation patterns with the potential to create a high degree of interaction between coastal and oceanic ecosystems. Based on a large dataset of oceanic predator stomach contents, our study used generalized linear models to explore the coastal-oceanic system interaction by analyzing predator-prey relationship. We show that reef organisms are a frequent prey of oceanic predators. Predator species such as albacore (Thunnus alalunga) and yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) frequently consume reef prey with higher probability of consumption closer to land and in the western part of the Pacific Ocean. For surface-caught-predators consuming reef prey, this prey type represents about one third of the diet of predators smaller than 50 cm. The proportion decreases with increasing fish size. For predators caught at depth and consuming reef prey, the proportion varies with predator species but generally represents less than 10%. The annual consumption of reef prey by the yellowfin tuna population was estimated at 0.8 ± 0.40 CV million tonnes or 2.17 × 10(12)± 0.40 CV individuals. This represents 6.1% ± 0.17 CV in weight of their diet. Our analyses identify some of the patterns of coastal-oceanic ecosystem interactions at a large scale and provides an estimate of annual consumption of reef prey by oceanic predators.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere36701
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Pacific Ocean
Reefs
predator-prey relationships
Ecosystems
Ecosystem
Diet
predators
reefs
Gastrointestinal Contents
ecosystems
Islands
Thunnus albacares
Linear Models
Fishes
Nutrition
Thunnus alalunga
Weights and Measures
Population
Bathymetry
Fish

Cite this

Allain, V., Fernandez, E., Hoyle, S. D., Caillot, S., Jurado-Molina, J., Andréfouët, S., & Nicol, S. J. (2012). Interaction between coastal and oceanic ecosystems of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean through predator-prey relationship studies. PLoS One, 7(5), 1-9. [e36701]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0036701
Allain, Valerie ; Fernandez, Emilie ; Hoyle, Simon D. ; Caillot, Sylvain ; Jurado-Molina, Jesus ; Andréfouët, Serge ; Nicol, Simon J. / Interaction between coastal and oceanic ecosystems of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean through predator-prey relationship studies. In: PLoS One. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 5. pp. 1-9.
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Allain, V, Fernandez, E, Hoyle, SD, Caillot, S, Jurado-Molina, J, Andréfouët, S & Nicol, SJ 2012, 'Interaction between coastal and oceanic ecosystems of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean through predator-prey relationship studies.', PLoS One, vol. 7, no. 5, e36701, pp. 1-9. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0036701

Interaction between coastal and oceanic ecosystems of the Western and Central Pacific Ocean through predator-prey relationship studies. / Allain, Valerie; Fernandez, Emilie; Hoyle, Simon D.; Caillot, Sylvain; Jurado-Molina, Jesus; Andréfouët, Serge; Nicol, Simon J.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 5, e36701, 01.01.2012, p. 1-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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