Interactive effects of reward sensitivity and residential fast-food restaurant exposure on fast-food consumption

Catherine Paquet, Mark Daniel, Bärbel Knäuper, Lise Gauvin, Yan Kestens, Laurette Dubé

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Local fast-food environments have been increasingly linked to obesity and related outcomes. Individuals who are more sensitive to reward-related cues might be more responsive to such environments. Objective: This study aimed to assess the moderating role of sensitivity to reward on the relation between residential fast-food restaurant exposure and fast-food consumption. Design: Four hundred fifteen individuals (49.6% men; mean age: 34.7 y) were sampled from 7 Montreal census tracts stratified by socioeconomic status and French/English language. The frequency of fast-food restaurant visits in the previous week was self-reported. Sensitivity to reward was self-reported by using the Behavioral Activation System (BAS) scale. Fast-food restaurant exposure within 500 m of the participants' residence was determined by using a Geographic Information System. Main and interactive effects of the BAS and fast-food restaurant exposure on fast-food consumption were tested with logistic regression models that accounted for clustering of observations and participants' age, sex, education, and household income. Results: Regression results showed a significant interaction between BAS and fast-food restaurant exposure (P < 0.001). Analysis of BAS tertiles indicated that the association between neighborhood fast-food restaurant exposure and consumption was positive for the highest tertile (odds ratio: 1.49; 95% CI: 1.20, 1.84; P < 0.001) but null for the intermediate (odds ratio: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.80, 1.34; P = 0.81) and lowest (odds ratio: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.51, 1.37; P = 0.49) tertiles. Conclusion: Reward-sensitive individuals may be more responsive to unhealthful cues in their immediate environment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)771-776
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume91
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Fast Foods
Restaurants
Reward
Odds Ratio
Cues
Logistic Models
Activation Analysis
Geographic Information Systems
Sex Education
Censuses
Social Class
Cluster Analysis
Language
Obesity

Cite this

Paquet, Catherine ; Daniel, Mark ; Knäuper, Bärbel ; Gauvin, Lise ; Kestens, Yan ; Dubé, Laurette. / Interactive effects of reward sensitivity and residential fast-food restaurant exposure on fast-food consumption. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2010 ; Vol. 91, No. 3. pp. 771-776.
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Interactive effects of reward sensitivity and residential fast-food restaurant exposure on fast-food consumption. / Paquet, Catherine; Daniel, Mark; Knäuper, Bärbel; Gauvin, Lise; Kestens, Yan; Dubé, Laurette.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 91, No. 3, 01.03.2010, p. 771-776.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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