Invasive wild pigs (Sus scrofa) as a human-mediated source of soil carbon emissions: Uncertainties and future directions

Christopher O'Bryan, Nicholas Patton, Jim Hone, Jesse Lewis, Violeta Berdejo-Espinola, Derek Risch, Matthew Holden, Eve McDonald-Madden

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

Abstract

Invasive wild pigs (Sus scrofa) have been spread by humans outside of their native range and are now established on every continent except Antarctica. Through their uprooting of soil, they affect societal and environmental values. Our recent article explored another threat from their soil disturbance: greenhouse gas emissions (O’Bryan et al., Global Change Biology, 2021). In response to our paper, Don (Global Change Biology, 2021) claims there is no threat to global soil carbon stocks by wild pigs. While we did not investigate soil carbon stocks, we examine uncertainties regarding soil carbon emissions from wild pig uprooting and their implications for management and future research.
Original languageEnglish
Article number15992
Pages (from-to)1-3
Number of pages3
JournalGlobal Change Biology
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2022

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