Investigating techniques to reduce evaporation from small reservoirs in Australia

F. Helfer, C. Lemckert, H. Zhang

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Climate change has been posing a great pressure on water resources, particularly in Australia. In South-East Queensland (SEQ), the annual evaporation is expected to rise by about 16 per cent in the next 60 years due to increasing greenhouse gas emissions. As the region relies on a large volume of stored water, the minimisation of evaporation is a key factor in guaranteeing availability of water in the future. This paper analyses the efficiency of some existing techniques in reducing evaporation from small dams within SEQ. The use of suspended covers, destratification systems and windbreaks was investigated using modelling. Of these techniques, suspended covers showed the greatest potential for reducing evaporation (in the order of 88 per cent). The efficiency of windbreaks was around 27 per cent, while the use of destratification system did not change evaporation rates. These results are encouraging, and further research is warranted to determine the cost-effectiveness and environmental impacts of the use of suspended covers and windbreaks to reduce evaporation from small dams.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication34th IAHR Congress 2011 - Balance and Uncertainty
Subtitle of host publicationWater in a Changing World, Incorporating the 33rd Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium and the 10th Conference on Hydraulics in Water Engineering
PublisherInternational Association for Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research (IAHR)
Pages1747-1754
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9780858258686
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2011
Externally publishedYes
Event34th IAHR Congress 2011 - Balance and Uncertainty: Water in a Changing World, Incorporating the 33rd Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium and the 10th Conference on Hydraulics in Water Engineering - Brisbane, Australia
Duration: 26 Jun 20111 Jul 2011

Conference

Conference34th IAHR Congress 2011 - Balance and Uncertainty: Water in a Changing World, Incorporating the 33rd Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium and the 10th Conference on Hydraulics in Water Engineering
CountryAustralia
CityBrisbane
Period26/06/111/07/11

Fingerprint

Evaporation
evaporation
Dams
dam
Cost effectiveness
Water resources
Gas emissions
Greenhouse gases
Climate change
Environmental impact
Water
greenhouse gas
environmental impact
water resource
Availability
water
climate change
cost
modeling

Cite this

Helfer, F., Lemckert, C., & Zhang, H. (2011). Investigating techniques to reduce evaporation from small reservoirs in Australia. In 34th IAHR Congress 2011 - Balance and Uncertainty: Water in a Changing World, Incorporating the 33rd Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium and the 10th Conference on Hydraulics in Water Engineering (pp. 1747-1754). International Association for Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research (IAHR).
Helfer, F. ; Lemckert, C. ; Zhang, H. / Investigating techniques to reduce evaporation from small reservoirs in Australia. 34th IAHR Congress 2011 - Balance and Uncertainty: Water in a Changing World, Incorporating the 33rd Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium and the 10th Conference on Hydraulics in Water Engineering. International Association for Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research (IAHR), 2011. pp. 1747-1754
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Helfer, F, Lemckert, C & Zhang, H 2011, Investigating techniques to reduce evaporation from small reservoirs in Australia. in 34th IAHR Congress 2011 - Balance and Uncertainty: Water in a Changing World, Incorporating the 33rd Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium and the 10th Conference on Hydraulics in Water Engineering. International Association for Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research (IAHR), pp. 1747-1754, 34th IAHR Congress 2011 - Balance and Uncertainty: Water in a Changing World, Incorporating the 33rd Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium and the 10th Conference on Hydraulics in Water Engineering, Brisbane, Australia, 26/06/11.

Investigating techniques to reduce evaporation from small reservoirs in Australia. / Helfer, F.; Lemckert, C.; Zhang, H.

34th IAHR Congress 2011 - Balance and Uncertainty: Water in a Changing World, Incorporating the 33rd Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium and the 10th Conference on Hydraulics in Water Engineering. International Association for Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research (IAHR), 2011. p. 1747-1754.

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

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AU - Zhang, H.

PY - 2011/1/1

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N2 - Climate change has been posing a great pressure on water resources, particularly in Australia. In South-East Queensland (SEQ), the annual evaporation is expected to rise by about 16 per cent in the next 60 years due to increasing greenhouse gas emissions. As the region relies on a large volume of stored water, the minimisation of evaporation is a key factor in guaranteeing availability of water in the future. This paper analyses the efficiency of some existing techniques in reducing evaporation from small dams within SEQ. The use of suspended covers, destratification systems and windbreaks was investigated using modelling. Of these techniques, suspended covers showed the greatest potential for reducing evaporation (in the order of 88 per cent). The efficiency of windbreaks was around 27 per cent, while the use of destratification system did not change evaporation rates. These results are encouraging, and further research is warranted to determine the cost-effectiveness and environmental impacts of the use of suspended covers and windbreaks to reduce evaporation from small dams.

AB - Climate change has been posing a great pressure on water resources, particularly in Australia. In South-East Queensland (SEQ), the annual evaporation is expected to rise by about 16 per cent in the next 60 years due to increasing greenhouse gas emissions. As the region relies on a large volume of stored water, the minimisation of evaporation is a key factor in guaranteeing availability of water in the future. This paper analyses the efficiency of some existing techniques in reducing evaporation from small dams within SEQ. The use of suspended covers, destratification systems and windbreaks was investigated using modelling. Of these techniques, suspended covers showed the greatest potential for reducing evaporation (in the order of 88 per cent). The efficiency of windbreaks was around 27 per cent, while the use of destratification system did not change evaporation rates. These results are encouraging, and further research is warranted to determine the cost-effectiveness and environmental impacts of the use of suspended covers and windbreaks to reduce evaporation from small dams.

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Helfer F, Lemckert C, Zhang H. Investigating techniques to reduce evaporation from small reservoirs in Australia. In 34th IAHR Congress 2011 - Balance and Uncertainty: Water in a Changing World, Incorporating the 33rd Hydrology and Water Resources Symposium and the 10th Conference on Hydraulics in Water Engineering. International Association for Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research (IAHR). 2011. p. 1747-1754