Isolated core training improves sprint performance in national-level junior swimmers

Matthew Weston, Angela Hibbs, Kevin THOMPSON, Iain Spears

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    18 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    PURPOSE: To quantify the effects of a 12-wk isolated core-training program on 50-m front-crawl swim time and measures of core musculature functionally relevant to swimming.

    METHODS: Twenty national-level junior swimmers (10 male and 10 female, 16±1 y, 171±5 cm, 63±4 kg) participated in the study. Group allocation (intervention [n=10], control [n=10]) was based on 2 preexisting swim-training groups who were part of the same swimming club but trained in different groups. The intervention group completed the core training, incorporating exercises targeting the lumbopelvic complex and upper region extending to the scapula, 3 times/wk for 12 wk. While the training was performed in addition to the normal pool-based swimming program, the control group maintained their usual pool-based swimming program. The authors made probabilistic magnitude-based inferences about the effect of the core training on 50-m swim time and functionally relevant measures of core function.

    RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the core-training intervention group had a possibly large beneficial effect on 50-m swim time (-2.0%; 90% confidence interval -3.8 to -0.2%). Moreover, it showed small to moderate improvements on a timed prone-bridge test (9.0%; 2.1-16.4%) and asymmetric straight-arm pull-down test (23.1%; 13.7-33.4%), and there were moderate to large increases in peak EMG activity of core musculature during isolated tests of maximal voluntary contraction.

    CONCLUSION: This is the first study to demonstrate a clear beneficial effect of isolated core training on 50-m front-crawl swim performance.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)204-210
    Number of pages7
    JournalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
    Volume10
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2015

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    Swimming Pools
    Scapula
    Control Groups
    Confidence Intervals
    Exercise
    Education

    Cite this

    @article{cec211b665df44f79499878df55c092a,
    title = "Isolated core training improves sprint performance in national-level junior swimmers",
    abstract = "PURPOSE: To quantify the effects of a 12-wk isolated core-training program on 50-m front-crawl swim time and measures of core musculature functionally relevant to swimming.METHODS: Twenty national-level junior swimmers (10 male and 10 female, 16±1 y, 171±5 cm, 63±4 kg) participated in the study. Group allocation (intervention [n=10], control [n=10]) was based on 2 preexisting swim-training groups who were part of the same swimming club but trained in different groups. The intervention group completed the core training, incorporating exercises targeting the lumbopelvic complex and upper region extending to the scapula, 3 times/wk for 12 wk. While the training was performed in addition to the normal pool-based swimming program, the control group maintained their usual pool-based swimming program. The authors made probabilistic magnitude-based inferences about the effect of the core training on 50-m swim time and functionally relevant measures of core function.RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the core-training intervention group had a possibly large beneficial effect on 50-m swim time (-2.0{\%}; 90{\%} confidence interval -3.8 to -0.2{\%}). Moreover, it showed small to moderate improvements on a timed prone-bridge test (9.0{\%}; 2.1-16.4{\%}) and asymmetric straight-arm pull-down test (23.1{\%}; 13.7-33.4{\%}), and there were moderate to large increases in peak EMG activity of core musculature during isolated tests of maximal voluntary contraction.CONCLUSION: This is the first study to demonstrate a clear beneficial effect of isolated core training on 50-m front-crawl swim performance.",
    keywords = "Athletic training, Exercise performance, Functional performance, Strength training",
    author = "Matthew Weston and Angela Hibbs and Kevin THOMPSON and Iain Spears",
    year = "2015",
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    doi = "10.1123/ijspp.2013-0488",
    language = "English",
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    pages = "204--210",
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    Isolated core training improves sprint performance in national-level junior swimmers. / Weston, Matthew; Hibbs, Angela; THOMPSON, Kevin; Spears, Iain.

    In: International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, Vol. 10, No. 2, 03.2015, p. 204-210.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Isolated core training improves sprint performance in national-level junior swimmers

    AU - Weston, Matthew

    AU - Hibbs, Angela

    AU - THOMPSON, Kevin

    AU - Spears, Iain

    PY - 2015/3

    Y1 - 2015/3

    N2 - PURPOSE: To quantify the effects of a 12-wk isolated core-training program on 50-m front-crawl swim time and measures of core musculature functionally relevant to swimming.METHODS: Twenty national-level junior swimmers (10 male and 10 female, 16±1 y, 171±5 cm, 63±4 kg) participated in the study. Group allocation (intervention [n=10], control [n=10]) was based on 2 preexisting swim-training groups who were part of the same swimming club but trained in different groups. The intervention group completed the core training, incorporating exercises targeting the lumbopelvic complex and upper region extending to the scapula, 3 times/wk for 12 wk. While the training was performed in addition to the normal pool-based swimming program, the control group maintained their usual pool-based swimming program. The authors made probabilistic magnitude-based inferences about the effect of the core training on 50-m swim time and functionally relevant measures of core function.RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the core-training intervention group had a possibly large beneficial effect on 50-m swim time (-2.0%; 90% confidence interval -3.8 to -0.2%). Moreover, it showed small to moderate improvements on a timed prone-bridge test (9.0%; 2.1-16.4%) and asymmetric straight-arm pull-down test (23.1%; 13.7-33.4%), and there were moderate to large increases in peak EMG activity of core musculature during isolated tests of maximal voluntary contraction.CONCLUSION: This is the first study to demonstrate a clear beneficial effect of isolated core training on 50-m front-crawl swim performance.

    AB - PURPOSE: To quantify the effects of a 12-wk isolated core-training program on 50-m front-crawl swim time and measures of core musculature functionally relevant to swimming.METHODS: Twenty national-level junior swimmers (10 male and 10 female, 16±1 y, 171±5 cm, 63±4 kg) participated in the study. Group allocation (intervention [n=10], control [n=10]) was based on 2 preexisting swim-training groups who were part of the same swimming club but trained in different groups. The intervention group completed the core training, incorporating exercises targeting the lumbopelvic complex and upper region extending to the scapula, 3 times/wk for 12 wk. While the training was performed in addition to the normal pool-based swimming program, the control group maintained their usual pool-based swimming program. The authors made probabilistic magnitude-based inferences about the effect of the core training on 50-m swim time and functionally relevant measures of core function.RESULTS: Compared with the control group, the core-training intervention group had a possibly large beneficial effect on 50-m swim time (-2.0%; 90% confidence interval -3.8 to -0.2%). Moreover, it showed small to moderate improvements on a timed prone-bridge test (9.0%; 2.1-16.4%) and asymmetric straight-arm pull-down test (23.1%; 13.7-33.4%), and there were moderate to large increases in peak EMG activity of core musculature during isolated tests of maximal voluntary contraction.CONCLUSION: This is the first study to demonstrate a clear beneficial effect of isolated core training on 50-m front-crawl swim performance.

    KW - Athletic training

    KW - Exercise performance

    KW - Functional performance

    KW - Strength training

    U2 - 10.1123/ijspp.2013-0488

    DO - 10.1123/ijspp.2013-0488

    M3 - Article

    VL - 10

    SP - 204

    EP - 210

    JO - International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

    JF - International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance

    SN - 1555-0265

    IS - 2

    ER -