It's not ownership that matters: It's publicness

Christopher Aulich

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    A key element of new public management in many jurisdictions has been the substitution of public by private sector ownership, and the replacement of public delivery and funding of services by private mechanisms. Despite these substitutions, there remains little credible evidence that ownership per se is a factor in organisational performance. Yet, many jurisdictions such as Australia have placed great faith in privatisation as a means of securing greater efficiencies in the provision of public services. This article suggests that rather than ask the question of whether or not organisations should be publicly or privately owned, a more important question needs to be answered: what makes organisations better able to provide for public outcomes? In answering this question, governments are better able to make decisions about what public services need to be provided and how their public services are best delivered. The article considers the Australian case of privatisation and notes that a focus on privatisation has often blinded the Australian government to the importance of maintaining ‘publicness’ or the important public outcomes of services they provide or fund.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)199-213
    Number of pages15
    JournalPolicy Studies
    Volume32
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2011

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    privatization
    public service
    substitution
    jurisdiction
    New Public Management
    faith
    private sector
    funding
    efficiency
    performance
    evidence

    Cite this

    Aulich, Christopher. / It's not ownership that matters: It's publicness. In: Policy Studies. 2011 ; Vol. 32, No. 3. pp. 199-213.
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    It's not ownership that matters: It's publicness. / Aulich, Christopher.

    In: Policy Studies, Vol. 32, No. 3, 2011, p. 199-213.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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