Japan's 2004 Pension Reforms in Response to Demographic Change: a legal critique

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Japan's public retirement system is in crisis. It faces two enormous problems. The first is apparently temporary. The economy that funds the pension program has under-performed in the last decade. The other problem is more difficult to address. Namely, Japanese society is experiencing a massive shift in its age structure with profound social and economic ramifications. 2 Financing the social security system of which the public pension accounts for approximately half has thus become a matter of urgent concern. Meanwhile, this issue and other structural problems have instigated a crisis of confidence in the public pension system, which has further harmful ramifications. Furthermore, the pension system is out of step with the industrial changes that are inseparably linked to demographic transition
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35-95
Number of pages61
JournalAsian-Pacific Law and Policy Journal
Volume8
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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Public pensions
Pension reform
Japan
Pension system
Demographic change
Pensions
Social security system
Demographic transition
Retirement
Economics
Financing
Confidence
Age structure

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title = "Japan's 2004 Pension Reforms in Response to Demographic Change: a legal critique",
abstract = "Japan's public retirement system is in crisis. It faces two enormous problems. The first is apparently temporary. The economy that funds the pension program has under-performed in the last decade. The other problem is more difficult to address. Namely, Japanese society is experiencing a massive shift in its age structure with profound social and economic ramifications. 2 Financing the social security system of which the public pension accounts for approximately half has thus become a matter of urgent concern. Meanwhile, this issue and other structural problems have instigated a crisis of confidence in the public pension system, which has further harmful ramifications. Furthermore, the pension system is out of step with the industrial changes that are inseparably linked to demographic transition",
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Japan's 2004 Pension Reforms in Response to Demographic Change: a legal critique. / Ryan, Trevor.

In: Asian-Pacific Law and Policy Journal, Vol. 8, No. 1, 2006, p. 35-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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