Journalistic Role Performance in Australia During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Events, Media Systems and Journalistic Practice

David Nolan, Kieran McGuinness, Jee Young Lee, Kate Holland, Monique Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This study analyses data gathered as part of an international comparative study of journalistic role performance during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. We situate role performance at the intersection between anterior factors that shape journalistic decision-making and practice, and the contingent events and issues journalists are tasked with communicating. Based on this, we ground our analysis by considering (a) how news is shaped by media systems, and how Australia’s media system may be characterised; (b) studies of journalists’ work during previous health crises; and (c) analyses of media coverage of the COVID-19 pandemic. Our analysis focuses, firstly, on whether role performance in Australia’s 2020 news coverage was discernibly “consensus-based”; and, secondly, on whether there were any indicators of Australian coverage being “polarised” during this period. Our findings suggest role performance in 2020 was broadly reflective of a relative political consensus and that evidence of polarisation was limited. We find, nevertheless, that there were notable differences between different mediums and outlets, and reflect on factors that may have contributed to such differences. In light of this, we emphasise the importance of taking account of the relationship between local contexts and historical contingency in considering how role performances are produced.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-19
Number of pages19
JournalJournalism Practice
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 11 Jan 2024

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Journalistic Role Performance in Australia During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Events, Media Systems and Journalistic Practice'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this