Landscape evolution of the Clarence River catchment: Weird rivers and wild ideas

Ken MCQUEEN

Research output: A Conference proceeding or a Chapter in BookConference contribution

Abstract

The Clarence River catchment in northern New South Wales is the largest river system on the southeast coast of Australia. It has a total area of 22,400 km2 with large gorges and deep valley systems on its western and southwestern margins. In the east the catchment is defined by a lowland fluvio-lacustrine, flood plain developed in two basins separated by a northerly trending ridge and marked by various anabranches and connected lagoons. Even a cursory examination of the catchment features suggests a remarkable complexity in its landscape evolution.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationFourth Australian Regolith Geoscientists Association Conference
EditorsMatilda Thomas
Place of PublicationAustralia
PublisherGeoscience Australia
Pages55-59
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781925297034
Publication statusPublished - 2016
EventFourth Australian Regolith Geoscientists Association Conference - Thredbo, Australia
Duration: 7 Feb 201611 Feb 2016

Conference

ConferenceFourth Australian Regolith Geoscientists Association Conference
CountryAustralia
CityThredbo
Period7/02/1611/02/16

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  • Cite this

    MCQUEEN, K. (2016). Landscape evolution of the Clarence River catchment: Weird rivers and wild ideas. In M. Thomas (Ed.), Fourth Australian Regolith Geoscientists Association Conference (pp. 55-59). Geoscience Australia.