Leadership behavior

A partial test of the employee work passion model

Richard Egan, Drea Zigarmi, Alice Richardson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study examined empirical associations between employee cognitive perceptions of leader behavior (directive behavior, supportive behavior) and leader values (self-concern, other orientation), employee positive affect and negative affect, and employee work intentions indicative of (dis)passionate employees. An internet-based self-report questionnaire survey was administered to 409 employees within three private sector organizations in Australia. Structural equation modeling indicated that supportive behavior, other-orientation, and self-concern had respective indirect effects on work intentions through employee positive affect. Employee positive affect was a stronger predictor of employee work intentions than was employee negative affect. Implications of these findings for theory and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-31
Number of pages31
JournalHuman Resource Development Quarterly
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 8 Mar 2019

Fingerprint

Employees
Passion
Leadership behavior
Positive affect
Positive Affect
Intentions
Negative affect
Private sector organizations
Predictors
World Wide Web
Self-report
Questionnaire survey
Indirect effects
Empirical study
Structural equation modeling
Directives
Structural Equation Modeling
Questionnaire
Private Sector Organizations
Indicative

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Egan, Richard ; Zigarmi, Drea ; Richardson, Alice. / Leadership behavior : A partial test of the employee work passion model. In: Human Resource Development Quarterly. 2019 ; pp. 1-31.
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Leadership behavior : A partial test of the employee work passion model. / Egan, Richard; Zigarmi, Drea; Richardson, Alice.

In: Human Resource Development Quarterly, 08.03.2019, p. 1-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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