Leaf morphology shift is not linked to climate change

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In a recent study, Guerin et al. [1] (Guerin, Wen and Lowe, hereafter GWL) used leaf width measurements from herbarium specimens of Dodonaea viscosa subsp. angustissima collected in South Australia to document two patterns. First, mean leaf width declined with increasing latitude. Latitude in their study region was strongly correlated with mean maximum temperature of the warmest month, such that leaf width declined as mean maximum temperature increased. This pattern is consistent with other studies that have documented predictable spatial variation in leaf morphology along gradients of temperature and moisture [2], implying that climate may exert a strong selection pressure on leaf morphology
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1-2
    Number of pages2
    JournalBiology Letters
    Volume9: 2012065
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Fingerprint

    Climate Change
    climate change
    Temperature
    leaves
    South Australia
    Climate
    Dodonaea viscosa
    Pressure
    herbaria
    temperature profiles
    spatial variation
    temperature
    climate

    Cite this

    @article{6c2514497fac4ed0bde20214e468fe51,
    title = "Leaf morphology shift is not linked to climate change",
    abstract = "In a recent study, Guerin et al. [1] (Guerin, Wen and Lowe, hereafter GWL) used leaf width measurements from herbarium specimens of Dodonaea viscosa subsp. angustissima collected in South Australia to document two patterns. First, mean leaf width declined with increasing latitude. Latitude in their study region was strongly correlated with mean maximum temperature of the warmest month, such that leaf width declined as mean maximum temperature increased. This pattern is consistent with other studies that have documented predictable spatial variation in leaf morphology along gradients of temperature and moisture [2], implying that climate may exert a strong selection pressure on leaf morphology",
    author = "Richard Duncan",
    year = "2013",
    doi = "10.1098/rsbl.2012.0659",
    language = "English",
    volume = "9: 2012065",
    pages = "1--2",
    journal = "Biology Letters",
    issn = "1744-9561",
    publisher = "Royal Society of London",

    }

    Leaf morphology shift is not linked to climate change. / Duncan, Richard.

    In: Biology Letters, Vol. 9: 2012065, 2013, p. 1-2.

    Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Leaf morphology shift is not linked to climate change

    AU - Duncan, Richard

    PY - 2013

    Y1 - 2013

    N2 - In a recent study, Guerin et al. [1] (Guerin, Wen and Lowe, hereafter GWL) used leaf width measurements from herbarium specimens of Dodonaea viscosa subsp. angustissima collected in South Australia to document two patterns. First, mean leaf width declined with increasing latitude. Latitude in their study region was strongly correlated with mean maximum temperature of the warmest month, such that leaf width declined as mean maximum temperature increased. This pattern is consistent with other studies that have documented predictable spatial variation in leaf morphology along gradients of temperature and moisture [2], implying that climate may exert a strong selection pressure on leaf morphology

    AB - In a recent study, Guerin et al. [1] (Guerin, Wen and Lowe, hereafter GWL) used leaf width measurements from herbarium specimens of Dodonaea viscosa subsp. angustissima collected in South Australia to document two patterns. First, mean leaf width declined with increasing latitude. Latitude in their study region was strongly correlated with mean maximum temperature of the warmest month, such that leaf width declined as mean maximum temperature increased. This pattern is consistent with other studies that have documented predictable spatial variation in leaf morphology along gradients of temperature and moisture [2], implying that climate may exert a strong selection pressure on leaf morphology

    U2 - 10.1098/rsbl.2012.0659

    DO - 10.1098/rsbl.2012.0659

    M3 - Letter

    VL - 9: 2012065

    SP - 1

    EP - 2

    JO - Biology Letters

    JF - Biology Letters

    SN - 1744-9561

    ER -