Leaps of faith in the obesity debate: a cautionary note for policy makers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The obesity epidemic has become an issue of major public concern in recent years, with dire predictions of its impact on public health budgets and the long‐term health of populations in the developed world. Governments are being urged to act to improve our eating habits and make us more active. Policy proposals range from education campaigns to banning junk food advertising to more extreme measures such as ‘fat taxes’. Although the debate has included discussion of public policy solutions to the problem, there has been little input from public policy specialists. This article explores some of the leaps of faith that are currently being made in the obesity debate and suggests that policy‐makers need to be cautious about how they respond to calls for action. It is suggested that public policy research may provide some useful frameworks for considering the nature of the problem and assessing possible solutions
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)493-500
Number of pages8
JournalThe Political Quarterly
Volume77
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

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faith
public policy
eating habits
taxes
budget
public health
campaign
food
health
education

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title = "Leaps of faith in the obesity debate: a cautionary note for policy makers",
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Leaps of faith in the obesity debate: a cautionary note for policy makers. / Botterill, Linda.

In: The Political Quarterly, Vol. 77, No. 4, 2006, p. 493-500.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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