Learning with children, ants, and worms in the Anthropocene: towards a common world pedagogy of multispecies vulnerability

Affrica TAYLOR, Veronica pacini-ketchabaw

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    66 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article takes the naming of the Anthropocene as a moment of pedagogical opportunity in which we might decentre the human as the sole learning subject and explore the possibilities of interspecies learning. Picking up on current Anthropocene debates within the feminist environmental humanities, it considers how educators might pedagogically engage with the issue of intergenerational environmental justice from the earliest years of learning. Drawing on two multispecies ethnographies within the authors’ Common World Childhoods' Research Collective, the article describes some encounters among young children, worms and ants in Australia and Canada. It uses these encounters to illustrate how paying close attention to our mortal entanglements and vulnerabilities with other species, no matter how small, can help us to learn with other species and rethink our place in the world
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)507-529
    Number of pages23
    JournalPedagogy, Culture and Society
    Volume23
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2 Oct 2015

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    Learning with children, ants, and worms in the Anthropocene: towards a common world pedagogy of multispecies vulnerability. / TAYLOR, Affrica; pacini-ketchabaw, Veronica.

    In: Pedagogy, Culture and Society, Vol. 23, No. 4, 02.10.2015, p. 507-529.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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