Lecturers' and students' perceptions of current teaching methods about schizophrenia

Jennifer Loh, Simon Restubog

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

Abstract

Schizophrenia affects about 24 million people worldwide.1 Many patients find the symptoms of schizophrenia highly distressing because they often find it difficult to communicate the exact nature of their psychosis in a way that others can understand. Similarly, although one can learn about patients through interviews, observation and assisting with treatment programs, psychiatry students and even therapists may not fully understand the experience of psychosis because they lack first hand experience of the illness. This raises concerns not only about the teaching methods currently being utilized to teach mental illnesses, but als about the ability for educators and future clinicians to empathize with patients.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)348
Number of pages1
JournalAustralasian Psychiatry
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Schizophrenia
Teaching
Students
Psychotic Disorders
Aptitude
Psychiatry
Observation
Interviews
Therapeutics

Cite this

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Lecturers' and students' perceptions of current teaching methods about schizophrenia. / Loh, Jennifer; Restubog, Simon.

In: Australasian Psychiatry, Vol. 15, No. 4, 2007, p. 348.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

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