Life history strategies and psychopathology

The faster the life strategies, the more symptoms of psychopathology

Jessie E. Hurst, Phillip S. Kavanagh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is little extant empirical literature examining the associations between life history strategies and symptoms of psychopathology. The current study (N = 138) investigated the associations between life history strategies, symptoms of psychopathology, aggression, incidence of self-harm behaviour, and attachment (perceived parental support) in sample drawn from the general population and community mental health service providers. The results from the study indicate those with a faster life strategy report greater levels of aggression and symptoms of psychopathology. Further, perceptions of poorer parental support were associated with a faster life history strategy. Implications for life history theory, conceptualising psychopathology, and future research directions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalEvolution and Human Behavior
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Psychopathology
life history
aggression
Aggression
life history theory
mental health
Community Mental Health Services
health services
incidence
Life History Traits
Life History
Incidence
Population
sampling

Cite this

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Life history strategies and psychopathology : The faster the life strategies, the more symptoms of psychopathology. / Hurst, Jessie E.; Kavanagh, Phillip S.

In: Evolution and Human Behavior, Vol. 38, No. 1, 01.2017, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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