Live high, train low - influence on resting and post-exercise hepcidin levels

A. D. Govus, Peter Peeling, Chris R Abbiss, N. G. Lawler, Dorine W Swinkels, Coby M Laarakkers, K. G. Thompson, Jeremiah John Peiffer, C. J. Gore, L. A. Garvican-Lewis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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    Abstract

    The post-exercise hepcidin response during prolonged (>2 weeks) hypoxic exposure is not well understood. We compared plasma hepcidin levels 3 h after exercise [6 × 1000 m at 90% of maximal aerobic running velocity (vVO2max )] performed in normoxia and normobaric hypoxia (3000 m simulate altitude) 1 week before, and during 14 days of normobaric hypoxia [196.2 ± 25.6 h (median: 200.8 h; range: 154.3-234.8 h) at 3000 m simulated altitude] in 10 well-trained distance runners (six males, four females). Venous blood was also analyzed for hepcidin after 2 days of normobaric hypoxia. Hemoglobin mass (Hbmass ) was measured via CO rebreathing 1 week before and after 14 days of hypoxia. Hepcidin was suppressed after 2 (Cohen's d = -2.3, 95% confidence interval: [-2.9, -1.6]) and 14 days of normobaric hypoxia (d = -1.6 [-2.6, -0.6]). Hepcidin increased from baseline, 3 h post-exercise in normoxia (d = 0.8 [0.2, 1.3]) and hypoxia (d = 0.6 [0.3, 1.0]), both before and after exposure (normoxia: d = 0.7 [0.3, 1.2]; hypoxia: d = 1.3 [0.4, 2.3]). In conclusion, 2 weeks of normobaric hypoxia suppressed resting hepcidin levels, but did not alter the post-exercise response in either normoxia or hypoxia, compared with the pre-exposure response.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)704-713
    Number of pages10
    JournalScandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports
    Volume27
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2017

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    Hepcidins
    Hypoxia
    Carbon Monoxide
    Hemoglobins
    Confidence Intervals

    Cite this

    Govus, A. D., Peeling, P., Abbiss, C. R., Lawler, N. G., Swinkels, D. W., Laarakkers, C. M., ... Garvican-Lewis, L. A. (2017). Live high, train low - influence on resting and post-exercise hepcidin levels. Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, 27(7), 704-713. https://doi.org/10.1111/sms.12685
    Govus, A. D. ; Peeling, Peter ; Abbiss, Chris R ; Lawler, N. G. ; Swinkels, Dorine W ; Laarakkers, Coby M ; Thompson, K. G. ; Peiffer, Jeremiah John ; Gore, C. J. ; Garvican-Lewis, L. A. / Live high, train low - influence on resting and post-exercise hepcidin levels. In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports. 2017 ; Vol. 27, No. 7. pp. 704-713.
    @article{441f835ab9b9485c9340ccc6e2c67e5b,
    title = "Live high, train low - influence on resting and post-exercise hepcidin levels",
    abstract = "The post-exercise hepcidin response during prolonged (>2 weeks) hypoxic exposure is not well understood. We compared plasma hepcidin levels 3 h after exercise [6 × 1000 m at 90{\%} of maximal aerobic running velocity (vVO2max )] performed in normoxia and normobaric hypoxia (3000 m simulate altitude) 1 week before, and during 14 days of normobaric hypoxia [196.2 ± 25.6 h (median: 200.8 h; range: 154.3-234.8 h) at 3000 m simulated altitude] in 10 well-trained distance runners (six males, four females). Venous blood was also analyzed for hepcidin after 2 days of normobaric hypoxia. Hemoglobin mass (Hbmass ) was measured via CO rebreathing 1 week before and after 14 days of hypoxia. Hepcidin was suppressed after 2 (Cohen's d = -2.3, 95{\%} confidence interval: [-2.9, -1.6]) and 14 days of normobaric hypoxia (d = -1.6 [-2.6, -0.6]). Hepcidin increased from baseline, 3 h post-exercise in normoxia (d = 0.8 [0.2, 1.3]) and hypoxia (d = 0.6 [0.3, 1.0]), both before and after exposure (normoxia: d = 0.7 [0.3, 1.2]; hypoxia: d = 1.3 [0.4, 2.3]). In conclusion, 2 weeks of normobaric hypoxia suppressed resting hepcidin levels, but did not alter the post-exercise response in either normoxia or hypoxia, compared with the pre-exposure response.",
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    Govus, AD, Peeling, P, Abbiss, CR, Lawler, NG, Swinkels, DW, Laarakkers, CM, Thompson, KG, Peiffer, JJ, Gore, CJ & Garvican-Lewis, LA 2017, 'Live high, train low - influence on resting and post-exercise hepcidin levels', Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, vol. 27, no. 7, pp. 704-713. https://doi.org/10.1111/sms.12685

    Live high, train low - influence on resting and post-exercise hepcidin levels. / Govus, A. D.; Peeling, Peter; Abbiss, Chris R; Lawler, N. G.; Swinkels, Dorine W; Laarakkers, Coby M; Thompson, K. G.; Peiffer, Jeremiah John; Gore, C. J.; Garvican-Lewis, L. A.

    In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, Vol. 27, No. 7, 01.07.2017, p. 704-713.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Live high, train low - influence on resting and post-exercise hepcidin levels

    AU - Govus, A. D.

    AU - Peeling, Peter

    AU - Abbiss, Chris R

    AU - Lawler, N. G.

    AU - Swinkels, Dorine W

    AU - Laarakkers, Coby M

    AU - Thompson, K. G.

    AU - Peiffer, Jeremiah John

    AU - Gore, C. J.

    AU - Garvican-Lewis, L. A.

    N1 - © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

    PY - 2017/7/1

    Y1 - 2017/7/1

    N2 - The post-exercise hepcidin response during prolonged (>2 weeks) hypoxic exposure is not well understood. We compared plasma hepcidin levels 3 h after exercise [6 × 1000 m at 90% of maximal aerobic running velocity (vVO2max )] performed in normoxia and normobaric hypoxia (3000 m simulate altitude) 1 week before, and during 14 days of normobaric hypoxia [196.2 ± 25.6 h (median: 200.8 h; range: 154.3-234.8 h) at 3000 m simulated altitude] in 10 well-trained distance runners (six males, four females). Venous blood was also analyzed for hepcidin after 2 days of normobaric hypoxia. Hemoglobin mass (Hbmass ) was measured via CO rebreathing 1 week before and after 14 days of hypoxia. Hepcidin was suppressed after 2 (Cohen's d = -2.3, 95% confidence interval: [-2.9, -1.6]) and 14 days of normobaric hypoxia (d = -1.6 [-2.6, -0.6]). Hepcidin increased from baseline, 3 h post-exercise in normoxia (d = 0.8 [0.2, 1.3]) and hypoxia (d = 0.6 [0.3, 1.0]), both before and after exposure (normoxia: d = 0.7 [0.3, 1.2]; hypoxia: d = 1.3 [0.4, 2.3]). In conclusion, 2 weeks of normobaric hypoxia suppressed resting hepcidin levels, but did not alter the post-exercise response in either normoxia or hypoxia, compared with the pre-exposure response.

    AB - The post-exercise hepcidin response during prolonged (>2 weeks) hypoxic exposure is not well understood. We compared plasma hepcidin levels 3 h after exercise [6 × 1000 m at 90% of maximal aerobic running velocity (vVO2max )] performed in normoxia and normobaric hypoxia (3000 m simulate altitude) 1 week before, and during 14 days of normobaric hypoxia [196.2 ± 25.6 h (median: 200.8 h; range: 154.3-234.8 h) at 3000 m simulated altitude] in 10 well-trained distance runners (six males, four females). Venous blood was also analyzed for hepcidin after 2 days of normobaric hypoxia. Hemoglobin mass (Hbmass ) was measured via CO rebreathing 1 week before and after 14 days of hypoxia. Hepcidin was suppressed after 2 (Cohen's d = -2.3, 95% confidence interval: [-2.9, -1.6]) and 14 days of normobaric hypoxia (d = -1.6 [-2.6, -0.6]). Hepcidin increased from baseline, 3 h post-exercise in normoxia (d = 0.8 [0.2, 1.3]) and hypoxia (d = 0.6 [0.3, 1.0]), both before and after exposure (normoxia: d = 0.7 [0.3, 1.2]; hypoxia: d = 1.3 [0.4, 2.3]). In conclusion, 2 weeks of normobaric hypoxia suppressed resting hepcidin levels, but did not alter the post-exercise response in either normoxia or hypoxia, compared with the pre-exposure response.

    KW - Iron metabolism

    KW - iron deficiency

    KW - altitude training

    KW - hypoxia

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