Managing Intergovernmental Relations: the Case of Agricultural Policy Cooperation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In June 2004, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) announced changes to the guidelines and protocols of some 40 ministerial councils and intergovernmental fora which comprise the web of intergovernmental consultative arrangements. This article examines the impact of the guidelines on the operation of the oldest of the sectoral ministerial councils, those relating to agriculture. The COAG guidelines aim to increase the strategic focus of the councils. However, in the case of agricultural policy there appears to have been a centralising of policy control, both within state governments and towards the Commonwealth, which undermines that objective and leaves the ministerial councils focusing on the more technical issues which they are more effective at addressing
LanguageEnglish
Pages186-197
Number of pages12
JournalAustralian Journal of Public Administration
Volume66
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

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title = "Managing Intergovernmental Relations: the Case of Agricultural Policy Cooperation",
abstract = "In June 2004, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) announced changes to the guidelines and protocols of some 40 ministerial councils and intergovernmental fora which comprise the web of intergovernmental consultative arrangements. This article examines the impact of the guidelines on the operation of the oldest of the sectoral ministerial councils, those relating to agriculture. The COAG guidelines aim to increase the strategic focus of the councils. However, in the case of agricultural policy there appears to have been a centralising of policy control, both within state governments and towards the Commonwealth, which undermines that objective and leaves the ministerial councils focusing on the more technical issues which they are more effective at addressing",
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Managing Intergovernmental Relations: the Case of Agricultural Policy Cooperation. / Botterill, Linda.

In: Australian Journal of Public Administration, Vol. 66, No. 2, 2007, p. 186-197.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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