Mapping the impact of social enterprise on disadvantaged individuals and communities in Australia’s regional cities

Jane Farmer, Tracy De Cotta, Sue Kilpatrick, Josephine Barraket, Christopher Brennan-Horley, Katharine Mckinnon, Viktoria Adler, Peter Kamstra, Sheridan Emery, Melissa Kennedy, Sarah-anne Munoz, Michael Roy

Research output: Book/ReportReports

Abstract

Social enterprises combine a social mission with an enterprise approach. Social enterprises are understood to contribute to the wellbeing of their participants and communities.

This report aims to explore how social enterprises realise wellbeing. It is aimed at practitioners, and provides useful tools for understanding wellbeing in social enterprise contexts. Results are derived from four case studies of social enterprises in two regional cities in Australia.

To understand wellbeing at social enterprises, the authors explore the case studies through three theoretical lenses: spaces of wellbeing theory; social capital theory; and diverse economies theory. These help to explain how wellbeing is realised at the individual and community levels.

Each of these theories presents a different model to understand wellbeing, and all provide valuable insights as applied to social enterprises.
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationAustralia
PublisherSwinburne University of Technology
Number of pages64
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2020
Externally publishedYes

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    Farmer, J., De Cotta, T., Kilpatrick, S., Barraket, J., Brennan-Horley, C., Mckinnon, K., Adler, V., Kamstra, P., Emery, S., Kennedy, M., Munoz, S., & Roy, M. (2020). Mapping the impact of social enterprise on disadvantaged individuals and communities in Australia’s regional cities. Swinburne University of Technology. https://doi.org/10.25916/5ea919c957bac